latchkey children


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latchkey children

Children who have a key to their home, needed for when they return home when no adult is present to supervise them. These children are at a higher risk of accidents, abusing drugs, and smoking cigarettes.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Census bureau estimate of number of latchkey children disputed.
Some librarians also see homework centers as resources for latchkey children, young people at risk, and as a way to promote lifelong learning.
Schools can help meet the needs of latchkey children in many ways.
They found that 23 percent of the high-risk, latchkey children reported drinking 11 or more alcoholic drinks during their lifetime, while only 11 percent of children with constant supervision reported drinking that much.
Latchkey children had more fears, a difference that related closely to the child-parent relationship.
The two-worker family with latchkey children now is the norm.
Library programs addressing the needs of young undereducated mothers who are often unemployed, or programs addressing the problems that latchkey children bring to the library, directly address an economic situation.
Main Street is a "full-service" center for babies, toddlers, preschoolers, and latchkey children. It's open from 7 a.m.
Researchers who conducted a survey of 349 third graders in an affluent Dallas suburb report thatk one child out of four has no adult supervision after school; but these latchkey children do not demonstrate poor social, emotional or intellectual development, as an earlier study had suggested.
The first-year findings revealed that while 21st-Century after-school centers changed where and with whom students spent some of their after-school time and increased parental involvement, they had limited influence on academic performance, no influence on feelings of safety or on the number of latchkey children, and negative influences on behavior.
During World War II, women flooded the labor market and the amount of latchkey children grew.
Others make daily phone calls to latchkey children with whom they are matched.