latch

(redirected from latchkey)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to latchkey: latchkey children

LATCH

Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children. The US version of ISOFIX, the international standard which specifies where the attachment points for child safety seats in passenger vehicles are to be placed.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

latch

, latch-on (lach) (lach′on″)
The attachment of the baby's mouth to the mother's nipple. Effective and comfortable latch-on is a crucial element in successful breast-feeding.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
"Latchkey children" is a phrase coined during World War Il to describe children who were regularly left without direct supervision before or after school.
Parents of latchkey children are especially concerned with their offspring's safety and exposure to dangers, both inside and outside the home.
The findings, described in the July DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY, contrast with recent warnings by some researchers that latchkey children face an increased risk of a wide array of emotional problems.
These kids, commonly called "latchkey children," spend a lot of time without adult supervision.
The daughter of a Colombian single mother, Paloma grew up in the same city, but between her Catholic education and latchkey home life, she's become street-smart and tough.
Now, the Video Doormana System has been enhanced with several new features, including forced entry notification, door ajar notification and latchkey child notification to parents when their children come home from school.
"Go - Cook Something!" is a great survival guide for active, intelligent kids ages 8-18 who just might benefit from some latchkey hungry filler skills.
It is inevitable, meanwhile, that many children will be "latchkey kids".
ERIC Descriptors: After School Programs; City Government; Partnerships in Education; Latchkey Children; School Community Programs; School Community Relationship; Educational Quality; Program Improvement; Change Strategies; Community Involvement; Family Work Relationship; Government Role; Community Resources; Community Coordination; Stakeholders; Educational Needs; Outreach Programs; Guidelines
Types of risks accepted: Commercial children's daycare centers, in-home (family) children's daycare centers, children's camps, Head Start programs, nursery schools, latchkey programs, mental health clinics, family counseling clinics, sheltered workshops, Goodwill/Salvation Army and similar facilities, homeless shelters, most nonprofits excluding colleges, universities, unions, churches and municipalities.
They are saying there is no problem with latchkey kids and that you don't need to be around for your children they can look after themselves.
And it will do much to improve the lives of the latchkey children who are currently forced to go home to empty houses and fend for themselves.