laryngology

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laryngology

 [lar″ing-gol´o-je]
the branch of medicine that deals with the throat, pharynx, larynx, nasopharynx, and tracheobronchial tree.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lar·yn·gol·o·gy

(lar'ing-gol'ŏ-jē),
The branch of medical science concerned with the larynx and the voice; the specialty of diseases of the larynx.
[laryngo- + G. logos, study]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

laryngology

(lăr′ən-gŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The branch of medicine that studies and treats the larynx, pharynx, and fauces.

lar′yn·gol′o·gist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

la·ryn·gol·o·gy

(lar'in-gol'ŏ-jē)
The branch of medical science concerned with the larynx; the specialty of diseases of the larynx.
[laryngo- + G. logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

laryngology

The branch of medicine concerned with the study and treatment of the LARYNX and its disorders. Laryngology is usually clinically associated with the study of the ear (otology) and of the nose (rhinology). An ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialist is called an otorhinolaryngologist (ORL).
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The redness seen by the laryngologist in examining the larynx is caused by dilated blood vessels.
The measurements were performed by 2 speech therapists and one laryngologist using panel data approach; obtaining the average of the measurements gathered from each rater.
The laryngoscopic images of each patient before and after treatment were compared by three experienced laryngologists. Complete response (CR) was defined as complete disappearance of the lesion for at least 4 weeks.
Branski (head and neck surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and otorhinolaryngology, Weill Cornell Medical College) and Sulica (otorhinolaryngology, Weill Cornell Medical College and New York Presbyterian Hospital) compile 38 frequently cited articles on topics in voice and laryngology for laryngologists, speech-language pathologists, and others in the medicine.
In 1905 delegations of laryngologists from all parts of the civilized world gathered in London on the occasion of his centenary to do him honor." (20)
Laryngologists and other researchers and practitioners dealing with the voice set out the current concepts in neurolaryngology, the latest specialty of laryngology, with a special emphasis on concepts with immediate clinical application.
Laryngologists, speech-language pathologists, nurses, singers, singing teachers, actors, acting teachers, and others organize celebratory events in cities throughout the world.
Sataloff (otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, Graduate Hospital, Philadelphia, and Thomas Jefferson U.) compiles 26 chapters contributed by laryngologists, speech-language pathologists, singing voice specialists, nurses, physiotherapists, acting voice trainers, and others from the US and UK, who discuss treatment procedures that are surgical, pharmacological, and behavioral.
It is useful for laryngologists to understand all three options.
In 23 chapters, laryngologists and head and neck surgeons mainly from the US outline aspects of clinical laryngology, including the anatomy and physiology of the larynx; evaluation and management of dysphonia and dysphagia; conditions like inflammation, laryngopharyngeal reflux, benign lesions of the vocal folds, benign tumors of the larynx, vocal fold immobility, laryngeal stenosis, neurologic and neuromuscular diseases, systemic and endocrine disorders, trauma, malignancies, and chronic aspiration; care of the professional voice; principles of phonosurgery; voice therapy; swallowing rehabilitation; tracheotomy; pediatric aspects; cough and the unified airway; and office-based surgery.
and Georgetown U.) in order to provide scientific and medical information of value to laryngologists, speech-language pathologists, voice teachers, and performers interested in the human voice.
Affiliate Membership is open to persons or groups that are interested in vocal pursuits but are not actually involved in the teaching of singing, such as speech therapists, laryngologists, schools, publishers, and music stores.