laryngeal electromyography

laryngeal electromyography

A technique analogous to conventional EMG used to differentiate neurogenic from myogenic disorders, localize a neurogenic lesion–ie, upper vs lower neurons, and differentiate organic from functional defects; LEMG is used to evaluate vocal fold dysfunction, tremor, myoclonus, pyramidal and extrapyramidal disorders, and primary muscular disorders, delineating specific disorders–eg, superior vs recurrent laryngeal nerve involvement, provide prognostic information. See Electromyography.
References in periodicals archive ?
Laryngeal electromyography demonstrated 25% decreased recruitment in the right cricothyroid and thyroarytenoid muscles.
Objective measures such as acoustic analysis and laryngeal electromyography (EMG) can provide additional information and serve as a baseline for any future assessments that may be performed following thyroid surgery.
1) Laryngeal electromyography must show increased muscle discharge of the thyroarytenoid or posterior cricoarytenoid muscles at the affected pitch(es).
Findings on laryngeal electromyography (EMG) can be useful in distinguishing between neural and mechanical causes of vocal fold immobility, although we have only level IV evidence to support its use.
Laryngeal electromyography confirmed mild right superior laryngeal nerve paresis and MTD (poor relaxation at rest).
Laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) assesses the function of the nerves supplying the laryngeal musculature.
Laryngeal electromyography revealed a 50% decrease in recruitment of the left recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) and a 70 to 80% decrease in the right RLN without significant synkinesis.
Once a movement disorder of the larynx is identified, laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) is ordered to help examine more accurately the integrity of the neuromotor (the nerve and muscle) system.
Laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) can confirm RLN compromise and determine the severity of injury.
Differentiation between an arytenoid dislocation and nerve injury can be difficult in these instances, and diagnosis usually is made with the aid of laryngeal examination, laryngeal electromyography, and computed tomography scanning.
Laryngeal electromyography detected paresis of the left superior laryngeal nerve.