larval therapy


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Related to larval therapy: Medical maggots
The use of disinfected fly larvae (green bottle fly, Phaenicia sericata, Medical Maggots™) to clean skin wounds and soft tissue which have necrotic tissue in the wounds that slow healing
Indications Debridment of non-healing necrotic skin and soft tissue wounds, including pressure ulcers, venous stasis ulcers, neuropathic foot ulcers, and non-healing traumatic or post surgical wounds

larval therapy

The use of maggots that feed on dead and infected tissue to assist in the healing of serious wounds. Used in rare cases in which healing is hampered by the resistance of the infecting organisms to antibiotics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cost effectiveness analysis of larval therapy for leg ulcers.
[31] demonstrated the total closure of wounds in less than 10 days when evaluating the healing of wounds treated with larval therapy in a nondiabetic rabbit model, even though the therapeutic effect of larvae could have contributed towards the mechanical debridement of tissue due to the larvae crawling over the wounds with the action of their spikes and the digestive effect of the enzymes [12], providing a certain advantage by using live organisms compared to just the chemical action induced by substances extracted from the larvae (haemolymph and fat bodies) as used in the present work.
Dumville, and The VenUS II Team, "Patients' perceptions and experiences of venous leg ulceration and their attitudes to larval therapy: an in-depth qualitative study," Health Expectations, 2013.
This may explain why, despite the clinically proven effectiveness of larval therapy to aid in the healing process, many US clinicians do not use this method of wound treatment.
Clinical Indications for Larval Therapy. For debriding nonhealing full thickness skin or sot tissue wounds with necrotic or non-viable tissue wound types that may benefit from larval therapy include; diabetic or neuropathic foot ulcers, venous stasis ulcers (where compression may be delayed a few days/weeks), pressure ulcers, and non-healing traumatic or postsurgical wounds.
Larval therapy was found to be linked with twice as much pain in the 24 hours before the removal of the first application compared with hydrogel.
The authors concluded that, although larval therapy is a more effective debriding agent than hydrogel, there is no evidence from this trial that it should be recommended for routine use on sloughy leg ulcers with the aim of speeding healing or reducing bacterial load.
"As we are already at the cutting edge of research in the larval therapy arena, our intention is to broaden our product range, which is where Suzanne's immense experience in quality assurance and regulation, and Alan's track record in R&D and production will be invaluable in enhancing our spectrum of innovative products."
The company - one of the UK's first NHS spinout businesses - is a fully commercial operation with rapidly growing markets in larval therapy. The company's products are now in routine use for the rapid debridement of infected and necrotic wounds.
"Virtually every hospital uses larval therapy in one form or another and they key area for growth in the UK is the community market where GPs and district nurses in the community can prescribe the product and retail pharmacists dispense them, just like prescriptions for drugs."