competence

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Related to language competence: Linguistic competence

competence

 [kom´pĕ-tens]
1. a principle of professional practice, identifying the ability of the provider to administer safe and reliable care on a consistent basis.
2. the ability of a patient to manage activities of daily living.

com·pe·tence

(kom'pĕ-tents),
1. The quality of being competent or capable of performing an allotted function.
2. In psychiatry, an antidote to certain types of anxiety.
3. The normal tight closure of a cardiac valve.
4. The ability of a group of embryonic cells to respond to an inducer.
5. The ability of a (bacterial) cell to take up free DNA, which may lead to transformation.
6. In psychiatry, the mental ability to distinguish right from wrong and to manage one's own affairs, or to assist one's counsel in a legal proceeding.
7. The state of reactivity of a cell, tissue, or organism that allows it to respond to certain stimuli.
[Fr. competence, fr. L.L. competentia, congruity]

competence

(kŏm′pĭ-təns)
n.
1.
a. The ability to do something well or efficiently.
b. A range of skill or ability: a task beyond his competence.
c. A specific ability or skill: a surprising competence in dealing with animals.
2. Law The quality or condition of being legally qualified or fit to perform an act.
3. Microbiology The ability of bacteria to be genetically transformable.
4. Medicine The ability to respond immunologically to bacteria, viruses, or other antigenic agents.
5. Linguistics The knowledge that enables one to speak and understand a language.
6. Sufficient means for a comfortable existence.

competence

Medspeak
The ability to effectively perform the activities of a particular occupation (or role) to the standards expected.

Psychiatry
A legally determined capability to act on one's own behalf.

competence

Patient's rights A legal term for the capacity of a person to act on his/her own behalf; the ability to understand information presented, to appreciate the consequences of acting–or not acting–on that information, and to make a choice. See Autonomy. Cf Incapacity, Incompetence Psychology A constellation of abilities possessed by a person for adequate decision-making; competency is a measure of a person's autonomy and ability to give permission for diagnostic tests or for dangerous, but potentially life-saving procedures. Cf Autonomy Vox populi Skill, ability. See Cultural competence.

com·pe·tence

(kom'pĕ-tĕns)
1. The quality of being skilled or capable of performing an allotted function.
2. The normal tight closure of a cardiac valve.
3. The ability of a group of embryonic cells to respond to an inducer.
4. The ability of a (bacterial) cell to take up free DNA, which may lead to transformation.
5. psychiatry The mental ability to distinguish right from wrong and to manage one's own affairs, or to assist one's counsel in a legal proceeding.
6. The state of reactivity of a cell, tissue, or organism that allows it to respond to certain stimuli. Sometimes called competency.

competence

  1. a period when a differentiating cell or tissue is capable of switching to an alternative developmental PATHWAY. See INDUCTION, CELL DIFFERENTIATION, GENE SWITCHING, CANALIZATION.
  2. a state in bacteria when they are able to receive DNA from other bacteria in a process called TRANSFORMATION.

com·pe·tence

(kom'pĕ-tĕns)
The quality of being competent or capable of performing an allotted function.

Patient discussion about competence

Q. Would people with bipolar disorder be considered eligible to compete in the olympics? I am a shuttle relay state champion. I won many cups in state and country level. My long-time-goal is to have my name at least on the Olympics list. But here is a new problem to spoil my goal. I am diagnosed as bipolar-I. Now my worry is would people with bipolar disorder be considered eligible to compete in the Olympics? Or will I be able to compete in the Special Olympics?

A. wow...good question...can mental health patient be a special Olympic athletes. i think you should check it out with simple phone call, here is how to locate a special Olympics Program near you:
http://info.specialolympics.org/Special+Olympics+Public+Website/English/Program_Locator/default.htm

More discussions about competence
References in periodicals archive ?
As a starting point, the explorations of the FLP, firstly, considered the results of English and French simulated proficiency exams that this educational context administered to determine learners' foreign language competence. The explorations then examined perceptual data in order to develop a better understanding of the FLP strategies and decisions and their effectiveness in promoting learner achievement.
Students' Perceptions of EMI Instructors' English Language Competence
The issue of language competence in EMI has already been identified by many scholars, who also suggest that the lack of specific adapted teaching materials can hamper the quality of bilingual programmes (Dafouz, 2007; Fernandez-Costales and Gonzalez-Riano, 2015; Halbach, Lazaro and Perez, 2013, Perez-Vidal, 2007).
These domains were assessed by tests of expressive vocabulary and mean length of utterance, two important measures of expressive language competence. These findings are in accordance with van Daal et al.
* On the other hand, students showed bias in rating their own language competence; students rated their language competence level as 'good' with a grand mean score of 3.86.
Also, tapping the expertise of the English language teachers, each department should conduct in--service trainings that promote language competence among its faculty across various fields.
We were of the belief that early development of oral language competence would facilitate both the transition to literacy and the acquisition of social skills.
Meanwhile, Cao, following Bachman's 1991 framework, describes translation proficiency as "consisting of three sets of variables [...]: (1) Translational Language Competence, (2) Translational Knowledge Structures, and (3) Translational Strategic Competence" (Cao, 1996, p.
The results were contrasted and most students proved to have improved their pragmatic awareness and language competence. After considering the final results, we observed that there was no difference between the participants.
The adult behavior and practices that are the focus of naturalistic teaching include the methods used to promote (1) child engagement in interactions with people and objects or materials, (2) sensitivity to and contingent social responsiveness to child communicative attempts, (3) positive adult affect manifested during interactions with a child, (4) the establishment of joint attention and reciprocal child-adult interactions, and (5) elaborations in child communication and language competence. These features, collectively, represent an interactive style that encourages and supports child communication and language competence (Enz & Christie, 1993; Kim & Mahoney, 2004)
The challenges for the 21st century higher education institutions set by the Bologna process (1999) and summarized in the requirements of Berlin Communique Realising the European Higher Education Area (2003) can be ensured only by due attention to preserving national languages, maintenance of the acquired foreign language competence, creating conditions for students' plurilingual and intercultural competence development.

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