land mines


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A victim-triggered antipersonnel device buried in a road or field and intended to—when trod upon or run over by a vehicle—explode and kill/maim the enemy

land mines

Explosive devices placed in or on the ground to injure, kill, or destroy humans, animals, or equipment passing over or near them. These are activated on contact. They remain active after armed conflict has ceased and, if they are not removed, can detonate years later, causing unexpected traumatic injury and death.
References in periodicals archive ?
Land mines are designed to detonate when people step on or near them, and they can remain deadly for years, even decades, after they have been placed in war zones.
The Pentagon cites the need to use land mines as a deterrent along the North and South Korea border.
Land mines being used in the Demilitarized Zone between North and South Korea are administered by South Korea, but the U.
There are also 3,520 plots of land that are riddled with land mines across the country.
Although the program will continue, Fare says the elimination of land mines in this conflict-prone area of Hajja needs months.
In implementing the family of scatterable mines, the primary responsibility for the deployment of land mines has shifted away from the engineer and toward a combined arms team that includes field artillery, combat aviation, and the U.
We will witness a world free from land mines if there is massive cooperation at international level," Vahidi said, "The double standard attitude and different views on the issue are among the problems that we are facing at international bodies.
The country's land-mine problem began before the 1975 beginning of the Civil War, says Habbouba Aoun, coordinator of the Land Mines Resource Center at the University of Balamand.
Once they hit the field, the rats can cover more than 186 square meters (2,000 square feet) per day looking for land mines.
He told the Hay Festival, in Mid-Wales: "I think everyone remembers she raised the profile of the land mines.
DIANA, Princess of Wales, was killed because she planned to expose senior members of the British arms trade involved with land mines, a leading lawyer has claimed.
Everybody is aware that the British involvement in the arms trade, particularly land mines, is and was a huge vested interest.