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lamp

 [lamp]
an apparatus for furnishing heat or light.
Gullstrand's slit lamp an apparatus for projecting a narrow flat beam of intense light into the eye. See also slit lamp.
slit lamp one embodying a diaphragm containing a slitlike opening, by means of which a narrow, flat beam of intense light may be projected into the eye. It gives intense illumination so that microscopic study may be made of the conjunctiva, cornea, iris, lens, and vitreous, the special feature being that it illuminates a section through the substance of these structures.
Examiner using hand-held slit lamp. (Photography by Leslie MacKeen.) From Stein et al., 2000.
sun lamp (ultraviolet lamp) an electric light that transmits ultraviolet rays; used as a therapeutic device and as a means of obtaining an artificial suntan. See also ultraviolet therapy.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lamp

(lamp),
Illuminating device; source of light.
See also: light.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
(1) Lamp

A device that generates light and/or heat
(2) LAMP
Neurology Acronym for Limbic system­associated membrane protein. A member of the IgLON (immunoglobulin LAMP, OBCAM and neurotrimin) subfamily of proteins within the immunoglobulin superfamily, which participate in regulating synapse formation in hippocampal neuron
Oncology Acronym for Locally Advanced Multimodality Protocol. A clinical trial that compared sequential chemotherapy (paclitaxel and carboplatin) followed by radiation therapy alone with (1) low-dose induction chemotherapy (as above) given weekly followed by concurrent chemoradiation and (2) concurrent chemoradiation regimen followed by consolidation chemotherapy (as above).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

LAMP

Cardiology A clinical trial–Locally Advanced Multimodality Protocol
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lamp

(lamp)
Illuminating device; source of light.
See also: light
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lamp

[Gr. lampein, to shine]
A device for producing and applying light, heat, radiation, and various forms of radiant energy for the treatment of disease, resolution of impairments, or palliation of pain.

infrared lamp

A lamp that develops a high temperature, emitting infrared rays; a heat lamp. The rays penetrate only a short distance (5 to 10 mm) into the skin. Its principal effect is to cause heating of the skin.
Enlarge picture
SLIT LAMP EXAMINATION
Enlarge picture
SLIT LAMP EXAMINATION

slit lamp

A lamp so constructed that an intense light is emitted through a slit; used for examination of the eye. See: illustration
illustration

sun lamp

Ultraviolet lamp.

ultraviolet lamp

A lamp that produces light with a wavelength in the range of 180 to 400 nm. It is used to treat certain skin conditions such as psoriasis or T-cell lymphoma, to promote wound healing by destroying bacteria, and to tan the skin. Ultraviolet lamps produce light within specific ranges: ultraviolet-A (UV-A) lamps generate light having a wavelength of 320 to 400 nm; ultraviolet-B (UV-B) produces light in the range of 290 to 320 nm; ultraviolet-C (UV-C) has a wavelength of 180 to 290 nm. Synonym: sun lamp

CAUTION!

Patients and operators must wear ultraviolet-resistant goggles during treatment. Overexposure to ultraviolet light produces burning and blistering of the skin and may predispose patients to skin cancers.

Wood's lamp

Wood's filter.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

lamp

Any device that produces light or heat.
Burton lamp Ultraviolet lamp, including some short wavelengths from the visible spectrum (e.g. Wood's light), mounted with a magnifying lens in a rectangular frame. It is used primarily in the evaluation of the fit of a hard contact lens, in conjunction with the instillation of fluorescein into the eye. See staining.
filament lamp A lamp in which light is produced by electrically heating a filament, usually of tungsten. The filament is contained in a bulb in which there is either a vacuum or an inert gas. The emitted spectrum is continuous. See continuous spectrum.
fluorescent lamp Discharge lamp in which most of the light is emitted by a layer of fluorescent material excited by the ultraviolet radiation from the discharge (CIE). See fluorescence.
halogen lamp A tungsten filament lamp in which the glass envelope is made of quartz and is filled with gaseous halogens. This permits a higher filament temperature and consequently provides a higher luminance and a higher colour temperature as well as a longer operating life than a conventional filament lamp of the same input power. Halogen lamps are used in some ophthalmoscopes and retinoscopes and as very bright sources for people with low vision. Syn. tungsten-halogen lamp.
incandescent electric lamp Lamp in which light is produced by means of a body (filament of carbon or metal) heated to incandescence by the passage of an electric current (CIE). See incandescence; luminescence.
Macbeth lamp A lamp used in testing colour vision. It contains a powerful tungsten filament bulb with a blue filter of specific absorption properties such that it produces a source of a colour temperature of about 6800 K, thus approximating the spectral characteristics of natural sunlight. The lamp is also fitted with a stand to hold the colour vision booklet (Fig. L2). Syn. Macbeth illuminant C. See CIE standard illuminants; pseudoisochromatic plates; Farnsworth test.tungsten-halogen l. See lamp, halogen.
Fig. L2 Macbeth lampenlarge picture
Fig. L2 Macbeth lamp
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

lamp

(lamp)
Illuminating device; source of light.
See also: light
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Police fear lampers, who use powerful lights to kill animals at night, may have fired at him on Friday.
"We do get calls from farmers who see lampers on their land, but it is all about priorities for the police."
For more information on bookings, contact Ryan Lampers, (360) 691-6706.
Author Year Area 1 Rinehart & Short 1993 Effective factors 2 Wu & Short 1996 Job commitment 3 Morris 1996 In-service training 4 Fox 1998 Teacher-learner model 5 Spreitzer 2000 Effective factors 6 Siegall and Gardner 2000 Psychological background 7 Savery and Luks 2001 Job satisfaction and stress level 8 Mohammadi 2001 Evaluation of strategies 9 Khatibi et al 2002 Educational-professional system 10 Bukingham and Klifton 2003 Identification of factors and background 11 Lampers 2004 Creativity 12 Mokhtari zadeh 2004 Factors analysis 13 Hor Abadi 2005 Organizational structure Table 2: Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test KM Human resources empowerment Kolmogorov-Smirnov Z 3.151 2.658 Asymp.
If the baiting takes place at night, when the badgers are outside, gangs of so-called 'lampers' shine bright spotlights at the animals to transfix them and lurcher dogs follow the beam to kill them.
The reflection of the lamplight in the eyes of the quarry direct the lampers' aim.
They described how the generally quiet lane is a popular place for dog walkers although it also attracts "courting couples," cars parking at night, lampers and "problems" with youths who gather under the bridge.
A few years ago a local farmer was shot dead by another farmer doing pest control and more recently a friend was very seriously injured by lampers using rifles.
Police are working on the theory that the boy may have been shot by mistake by "lampers" - hunters who carry lamps to startle animals and then target them.
The 57-year-old said: "I'm sure this is the doing of lampers or poachers looking for deer and hares.
Over the past three months, illegal lampers have descended on a quiet, residential street in Aigburth.
Mr Fell added: "There are a great number of foxes killed by lampers and gamekeepers but what most people do is simply bury them or get rid of them.