lamina papyracea


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or·bi·tal plate of eth·moid bone

[TA]
a thin plate of ethmoid bone forming part of the medial wall of the orbit and the lateral wall for the ethmoidal labyrinth.

lamina papyracea

A thin, smooth plate of bone on the lateral surface of the ethmoid bone; it forms part of the orbital plate.
See also: lamina

lamina papyracea

Synonym for the orbital plate of the ethmoid bone, which forms part of the medial wall of the orbit. It is thus named because it is as thin as paper and this may contribute to an infection of an ethmoidal sinus spreading into the orbit and resulting in orbital cellulitis. See orbital cellulitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Computed tomography scan showing medial fracture of the lamina papyracea with intraconal fat stranding (red arrow).
Ethmoid bulla occupying a lower position than normal, whereby the outer wall of the lowest cell is formed by the orbital wall of the superior maxilla instead of the lamina papyracea: Skillern.
The infection can spread directly through the thin lamina papyracea into the orbits.
(6,16,17) The most common radiologic finding on CT was bony defect of lamina papyracea and/or medial superior orbital rim.
Ethmoid Bulla occupying a lower position than normal, whereby the outer wall of the lower cell is formed by the orbital wall of the superior maxilla instead of the lamina papyracea: Skillern.
9): Infraorbital ethmoid cells are pneumatized ethmoid air cells that project along the medial roof of the maxillary sinus and the most inferior portion of the lamina papyracea, below the ethmoid bulla and lateral to the uncinate process.
Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a left frontoethmoid mass with evidence of bone erosion at the skull base and lamina papyracea (figure 1, A).
Anatomically, frontal recess is bounded medially by the middle turbinate and laterally by the lamina papyracea. (2) The posterior wall of the frontal recess is the bulla lamella.
Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a soft-tissue mass that extended from the nasal cavity to the maxillary and ethmoid sinuses and eroded the lamina papyracea; a bony defect was seen in the floor of the left nasal cavity (figure 2).
Orbital extension takes place through erosion of lamina papyracea.
A comparison of the patient's most recent computed tomography (CT) scans with previous studies revealed the presence of a slowly growing mass with diffuse enhancement of the right anterior ethmoid complex and with erosion through the lamina papyracea and opacification of the frontal sinus (figure 1).
CT scan of Head and PNS showed 6 x 5cm sized, soft tissue density, heterogeneously enhancing mass, occupying left ethmoid sinus extending in to the frontal sinus, with destruction of lamina papyracea and cribriform plate on both sides with intra-orbital and intracranial extension.

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