laity


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laity

[lā′itē]
Etymology: Gk, laikos, of the people
a nonprofessional segment of the population, as viewed from the perspective of a member of a particular profession. A clergyman may regard a physician as a member of the laity and vice versa.

laity

(lā′ĭ-tē) [Gr. laos, the people]
Individuals who are not members of a particular profession such as law, dentistry, medicine, or the ministry.
References in periodicals archive ?
The council members tried to balance their desire for greater engagement by the laity with preserving the church's hierarchical structure.
However, it should be clear that we acted upon the request of the Government, because it had understood that there could be no other military solution," Laity explains the events in Aracinovo.
While no testimony can be given from Luther to assert a distinction between laity and clergy, his emphasis is that it is the authority of the proclaimed word that renews the public office of ministry (4).
urges the laity (and clergy) to become knowledgeable about church history, particularly regarding the role culture plays in church practice.
Cossar examines the connections between social values and religious activity among the laity in the diocese of Bergamo by studying the institutions to which they turned to meet their religious needs: confraternities, hospitals, and parish churches.
The laity voiced their struggles with large families and called overwhelmingly for a lift on the birth control ban.
The author supports this rather hopeful notion by demonstrating a heartfelt and unwavering desire among the laity to be in communion with the church--as made evident through lay-edited Catholic magazines, parishioner letters to their priests and amongst themselves, and an increasing amount of social data on Catholics and sexuality.
I was especially happy to read in that interview his concern for implementing the role of the laity since the Council.
Seven people are fully enrolled in the laity program with 30 or 40 more taking individual courses.
Incidentally,if Ministers are paid to be good,does that mean that the laity are good for nothing?
The author addresses issues that pervaded society at the time and sets for herself the daunting task of investigating how an emerging Catholic laity would find their place in that society while at the same time creating their own identity.
The change, somewhat like exposing part of the belly of the nave -- a spatial move -- conspires to order temporally and ennoble the procession of both laity and clergy as each chapel, daylit from mysterious sources above, invites repose.