lag

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lag

 [lag]
1. the time elapsing between application of a stimulus and the resulting reaction.
2. the early period after inoculation of bacteria into a culture medium, in which the growth or cell division is slow.
lag of accommodation the extent to which the eyes fail to focus accurately.
anaphase lag delayed movement during anaphase of one homologous chromosome in mitosis or of one chromatid in meiosis, so that the chromosome is not incorporated into the nucleus of one of the daughter cells; the result is one normal cell and one cell with monosomy.
jet lag see jet lag.

lag

(lag),
1. To move or progress more slowly than normal; to fall behind.
2. The act or condition of falling behind.
3. The time interval between a change in one variable and a consequent change in another variable.
References in periodicals archive ?
The impact of lagged profit changes is significantly negative with respect to current profit changes for each of the four quarterly lags, but the magnitude of the coefficients falls from -0.629 to -0.087 from t-1 to t-4, and therefore, we do not consider the coefficient on the fourth lag economically significant (see footnote 17); the first lag of excess stock returns is significantly positive with a point estimate of 0.006, which is economically insignificant.
On the other hand, in a study conducted in Sao Paulo, where the concentration of N[O.sub.2] was 103.5 [micro]g/[m.sup.3], it observed that with the increase of 10[micro]g/[m.sup.3] in N[O.sub.2] concentrations had a positive association with admissions due to respiratory diseases most significant on the fifth day after exposure (3), different from our study where the greatest significance in the lag 7, possibly due to the difference in the mean concentration of this pollutant, because in Sao Paulo this concentration was approximately 2.5 times greater with a possible sharper dose-response effect.
Assuming the rates of OIs occurring on days on which [T.sub.day] (lag 0 to lag 2) was comprised in the < 75th percentile exposure groups as the referent ones, the Poisson regression analysis modeled for the May-September time period identified significantly increased risk of OIs (OR = 1.119, 95% CI: 1.008-1.242, and OR = 1.125, 95% CI: 1.013-1.249) for the > 95th percentile exposure groups as assessed in terms of [T.sub.day] lag 0 and lag 1 whereas no significant differences were found for [T.sub.day] lag 2.
(b) Results from a Poisson generalized additive distributed lag model, constrained with a second degree polynomial, using cumulative lag structures of lags 0-30 days for [PM.sub.10], N[O.sub.2], and CO, adjusted by trend, seasonality, temperature, relative humidity, weekdays, and holidays.
Figures in rows denoted Autocorrelation 1, 2, and 3 provide autocorrelations with one, two, and three lags. Figures in rows denoted cross-autocorrelation 1, 2, and 3 report correlations between the time t-dated returns of the asset in that column and returns of the other asset at times t - 1, t - 2, and t - 3.
The spectral lag is defined as the delay between low energy photons respect to high energy photons [2] [3]; and according to the Norris' model, the spectral lag is determined like the difference between the maximum amplitude time ([t.sub.peak] = [square root of [[tau].sub.1][[tau].sub.2]]) of two energy channels: [[tau].sub.lag] = [t.sub.peak,low]-[t.sub.peak,high].
Owing to the importance of getting insight into the relation of monetary policy instrument and its ultimate objective several studies have been conducted on the issue of lags associated with the monetary policy in different developed and developing countries.
The first lags of changes in tax rates ([[delta][[tau].sub.t-1] ) and in government spending rates ([[delta][g.sub.t-1] ) are significant and effective on the equation for the changes in government spending rates (in equation 2).
In this paper we explore the impact of detection lags in collusion sustainability under Abreu's optimal punishment penal code.
T1 could appear at the third, fourth, or fifth position in the stream, and T2 could appear two or eight lags after T1 (i.e., with one or seven intervening distractors), reflecting a stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) of 142 and 568 ms, respectively.
The assessment shows that removing the LAGs restrictions in April 2013, as earlier predicted in EU law, may lead to significant operational risk for the airports and airlines.