lag phase


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Related to lag phase: Log phase

lag phase

a brief period in the course of the growth of a bacterial culture, especially at the beginning, during which the growth is very slow or scarcely appreciable.

lag phase

Emergency medicine The period between when a person is exposed to a toxic inhalant–eg, cadmium fumes, dimethyl sulfate, methyl bromide, ozone, nitrogen oxides, phosgene, phosphorus compounds and others and development of pulmonary edema–up to 12 hrs

lag phase

  1. the stage of growth of microbial cells where nucleic acids and proteins are synthesized, but there is no cell division.
  2. an adaption stage. See GROWTH CURVE
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Transference Function (TF) model obtained an [R.sup.2]> 0.9, the results of certain parameters as lag phase indicated that this model is not appropriate to predict methane production.
(b) Differences in length of lag phase. (c) Differences in amyloid formation rate.
Moreover, [beta]-CyD and Tre prolonged the lag phase of the aggregation process and [beta]-CyD and Tre decreased the aggregation rate.
When HEWL in [D.sub.2]O solution was incubated at 62[degrees]C, the peptide backbone became fully deuterated during the lag phase as evidenced by the disappearance of the amide I band at 1540 [cm.sup.-1] after 5h incubation [12].
bulgaricus, the lag phase was 5 hours and the exponential phase extended to 25 hours, from which time a stationary phase was observed.
With the highest inoculum density of 108 CFU/mL, chlorpyrifos degraded up to 99 (Percent) within 18days of incubation with apparently no lag phase. Whereas, low inoculum density (104 CFU/mL) shows longer lag phase and degraded maximum of 81 (Percent).
After the lag phase was over, the cumulative biogas production was suddenly increased, when C[H.sub.4] composition was stable with routine leachate circulation.
To fill in this knowledge gap researchers at IFR, along with colleagues at Campden BRI, a membership-based organisation carrying out research and development for the food and drinks industry, have developed a simple and robust system for studying the biology of Salmonella during lag phase. In this system, lag phase lasts about two hours, but the cells sense their new environment remarkably quickly, and within four minutes switch on a specific set of genes, including some that control the uptake of specific nutrients.
The first bacterial growth phase is the lag phase, which according to Trabulsi and Alterthum (2008) is an adaptation period to the environment which they were exposed to, with intense metabolic activity and enzyme production that are prerequisites for their division.
For all treatments incubated at 86[degrees]F there was a prolonged lag phase that was detected for both millet grain spawn and Matrix[R] which was overcome between day 7 and day 10 (Figure 2).