laetrile


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Related to laetrile: Vitamin B17

laetrile

 [la´ĕ-tril]
amygdalin derived from crushed pits of certain fruits.

la·e·trile

(lā'ĕ-tril),
An allegedly antineoplastic drug consisting chiefly of amygdalin derived from apricot pits; no benficial effect has been proven.

laetrile

(lā′ĭ-trĭl′, -trəl)
n.
A substance derived from amygdalin that has been promoted by some individuals as a treatment for cancer, although scientific studies have found no evidence of its effectiveness.

laetrile

Amygdalin Quackery A cyanide-rich bitter almond, apricot or peach pit extract, claimed to be effective in treating cancer. See Manner cocktail, Tijuana, Unproven methods of cancer management.

la·e·trile

(lā'ĕ-tril)
An allegedly antineoplastic drug consisting chiefly of amygdalin derived from apricot pits; no beneficial effect ever has been proven.

laetrile

A substance, amygdalin, derived from the seeds of bitter almonds, apricots and other fruit, that has been claimed to be effective in treating cancer. It is said to yield a cyanide-containing compound, mandelonitrile, under the action of enzymes said to be more plentiful in cancers than in normal tissue. There is no medically acceptable evidence that laetrile has any value in the treatment of cancer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Source and chemical formula of amygdalin were often withheld and, when "laetrile" was used, it is unclear whether the semi-synthetic, patented form of amygdalin or natural amygdalin was employed.
In July 1977, a poll showed that 58 percent of Americans believed Laetrile should be sold legally, versus only 28 percent who opined that it should remain illegal.
Moss goes through great pains to explain how each prominent doctor or scientist or politician or hospital board member came to play a role in the story of laetrile. One such person who stands out is Dr.
Because of the lack of evidence that laetrile works, and the serious side effects it can cause, it's not authorised for sale in the European Union.
Although Laetrile was available in other countries, the FDA resisted
District Court for the Eastern District of New York sentenced Jason Vale to sixty-three months in prison and three years of supervised release for defying a court order to stop advertising and selling Laetrile to cancer patients.
They promote treatments with no proven value--for example, a diet dangerously low in protein or drugs such as Laetrile. By using unproven methods, people with cancer may lose valuable time and the chance to receive a proven, effective treatment.
Laetrile, a compound chemically related to amygdalin, and found naturally in the pits of apricots and various other fruits, gained notoriety as a focus of political activities intended to abolish the laws protecting Americans from quackery.
Like those found in the Japanese Loquat leaf, which we are told contains various vitamins including "vitamin B17." Actually, there is no vitamin called B17, but the term is commonly used to describe cancer "cure" also known as "laetrile." The patch also contains vitamin C, which according to the label reduces cholesterol, blood pressure, and the risk of blood clot formation.
Majak and Cheng (1984, 1987) demonstrated that many ruminal bacteria have the ability to release free cyanide from the glycosides amygdalin (laetrile), prunasin, and linamarin (cyanogenic glucosides in cassava).
According to Cancer Research UK, Vitamin B17, which is also known as laetrile, contains highly poisonous cyanide and can cause serious side effects.
The B17 pills - called Laetrile or Amygdalin - are illegal to sell in the US after trials proved they had no effect on the killer disease.