lacuna

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lacuna

 [lah-ku´nah] (L.)
1. a small pit or hollow cavity.
2. a defect or gap, as in the field of vision (scotoma). adj., adj lacu´nar.
absorption lacuna resorption lacuna.
bone lacuna a small cavity within the bone matrix, containing an osteocyte, and from which slender canaliculi radiate and penetrate the adjacent lamellae to anastomose with the canaliculi of neighboring lacunae, thus forming a system of cavities interconnected by minute canals.
cartilage lacuna any of the small cavities within the cartilage matrix, containing a chondrocyte.
Howship's lacuna resorption lacuna.
intervillous lacuna one of the spaces of the placenta occupied by maternal blood, into which the fetal villi project.
osseous lacuna bone lacuna.
lacuna pharyn´gis a depression of the pharyngeal end of the eustachian tube.
resorption lacuna a pit or concavity found in bones undergoing resorption, frequently containing osteoclasts. Similar lacunae also may be found in eroding surfaces of cementum.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

la·cu·na

, pl.

la·cu·nae

(lă-kū'nă, -kū'nē),
1. A small space, cavity, or depression.
2. A gap or defect.
3. An abnormal space between strata or between the cellular elements of the epidermis.
4. Synonym(s): corneal space
[L. a pit, dim. of lacus, a hollow, a lake]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lacuna

(lə-kyo͞o′nə, -ko͞o′-)
n. pl. lacu·nae (-nē) or lacu·nas
Anatomy A cavity, space, or depression, especially in a bone, containing cartilage or bone cells.

la·cu′nal adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Histology A small, hollow chamber that houses an osteocyte in mature bone tissue or a chondrocyte in cartilage tissue
Medspeak A small pit, cavity, defect or gap
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

la·cu·na

, pl. lacunae (lă-kū'nă, -nē)
1. [TA] A small space, cavity, or depression.
2. A gap or defect.
3. An abnormal space between strata or between the cellular elements of the epidermis.
4. Synonym(s): corneal space.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lacuna

Any empty space, missing part, cavity or depression.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

lacuna

a cavity or depression, for example, one of many small spaces between the lamellae of bones that is occupied by individual bone cells. Small canals (canaliculi) radiate from the lacunae and in these are small protoplasmic processes which connect with the osteoblasts in other lacunae. see HAVERSIAN CANAL.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

la·cu·na

, pl. lacunae (lă-kū'nă, -nē)
1. [TA] Small space, cavity, or depression.
2. Gap or defect.
3. Abnormal space between strata or between the cellular elements of the epidermis.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Cakalli, "Lacunary statistical convergence in topological groups," Indian Journal of Pure and Applied Mathematics, vol.
Let [??](x) be the noisy lacunary cubic spline interpolant of y(x) determined by (11).
The bishop must oversee the building of a basilica that would be "not only superior to those in all other places, but the other arrangements, also, may be such that the excellences of every city are surpassed by this foundation." (41) Constantine requested that Macarius compile lists regarding materials and supplies, which he should then dispatch "with all speed to the aforementioned magistrates" detailing "how many laborers and craftsmen and what other expenditures are required." With the aid of his clerical staff, Macarius had to decide what type of marble to use for the columns and whether or not to coffer the ceiling of the basilica, as well as what type of lacunary panels should be installed.
The two texts considered here fall into the latter two categories, as although both have been edited several times in the last century, these editions have tended to be perhaps unduly interventionist or are lacunary.
lacunary. In the cases of Kosovo and East Timor, the Council left it
Bare white lacunary sections represent various conditions: forgetfulness, inattention, sleep, and various stages of senility.
In nominating Lambersy for the 1996 Neustadt Prize, the bilingual Paris-based writer Albert Russo states: "Werner Lambersy's work is formally lacunary and averse to syntax, allowing it to establish a new manner of organizing the words on the page.
Suzuki, On the family of holomorphic mappings into projective space with lacunary hypersurfaces, J.
In a footnote, Waines wonders whether his text may not be lacunary or abridged.
And so it is, in another passage even closer to de Man, we perhaps discover Hejinian "sit[ting] in a cloven space," where "Patterns promote an outward likeness, between little white silences" (75)--the "lacunary silence of writing," Mark Taylor calls it, in "the uncanny space" which exceeds all logocentric systems (Tears 85).(7)
At the time of its release, Straub described his film, which covers several decades of a Cologne family during and after the Nazi era, as follows: "Far from being a puzzle film (like Citizen Kane or Muriel), Not Reconciled is better described as a 'lacunary film,' in the same sense that Littre defines a lacunary body: a whole composed of agglomerated crystals with intervals among them, like the interstitial spaces between the cells of an organism."