lacunar infarction


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Related to lacunar infarction: Lacunar Syndrome
Any of multiple small cerebral infarcts in the corona radiata, internal capsule, striatum, thalamus, basis pontis, and/or cerebellum, occasionally preceded by transient symptoms, due to occlusion or stenosis of small penetrating branches of the middle and posterior cerebral and median branches of the basilar arteries; resolution of infarcts is characterised by residual 1–3-mm cavities or lacunae, characteristic of long-standing hypertension

lacunar infarction

A small stroke deep within the brain (as in the internal capsule, basal ganglia, thalamus, or pons) caused by damage to or a blockage of a tiny penetrating artery. Lacunar infarctions are associated with a kind of vascular damage caused by chronic high blood pressure called lipohyalinosis. They may be asymptomatic, showing up only on brain imaging, or may produce pure motor, pure sensory, ataxic, or mixed motor and sensory symptoms. Synonym: lacunar stroke
See also: infarction
References in periodicals archive ?
Distinguishing silent lacunar infarctions from enlarged Virchow-Robin spaces: a magnetic resonance imaging and pathological study.
6 yrs) with multiple lacunar infarctions who visited the Department of Japanese Oriental (Kampo) Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University Hospital, were examined.
Prospective study of lacunar infarction using magnetic resonance imaging.
c) FLAIR images showed demyelination around bilateral ventricles and lacunar infarctions.
Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed mild generalized atrophy and multiple old lacunar infarctions within the basal ganglia bilaterally.
With lacunar infarctions, both upper-limb (UL) and lower-limb paresis are related purely to a white matter lesion [11].
Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed 10 days after the onset showed an infarction in the left ventromedial part of the upper mesencephalon and old multiple chronic lacunar infarctions in the deep white matter of the cerebral hemispheres (Figure 1C)
Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple acute lacunar infarctions involving the bilateral hemispheres and pons.
8 percent of the participants had the silent lacunar infarctions, small areas of damage to the brain seen on MRI that never caused obvious symptoms.