lacuna

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lacuna

 [lah-ku´nah] (L.)
1. a small pit or hollow cavity.
2. a defect or gap, as in the field of vision (scotoma). adj., adj lacu´nar.
absorption lacuna resorption lacuna.
bone lacuna a small cavity within the bone matrix, containing an osteocyte, and from which slender canaliculi radiate and penetrate the adjacent lamellae to anastomose with the canaliculi of neighboring lacunae, thus forming a system of cavities interconnected by minute canals.
cartilage lacuna any of the small cavities within the cartilage matrix, containing a chondrocyte.
Howship's lacuna resorption lacuna.
intervillous lacuna one of the spaces of the placenta occupied by maternal blood, into which the fetal villi project.
osseous lacuna bone lacuna.
lacuna pharyn´gis a depression of the pharyngeal end of the eustachian tube.
resorption lacuna a pit or concavity found in bones undergoing resorption, frequently containing osteoclasts. Similar lacunae also may be found in eroding surfaces of cementum.

la·cu·na

, pl.

la·cu·nae

(lă-kū'nă, -kū'nē),
1. A small space, cavity, or depression.
2. A gap or defect.
3. An abnormal space between strata or between the cellular elements of the epidermis.
4. Synonym(s): corneal space
[L. a pit, dim. of lacus, a hollow, a lake]

lacuna

(lə-kyo͞o′nə, -ko͞o′-)
n. pl. lacu·nae (-nē) or lacu·nas
Anatomy A cavity, space, or depression, especially in a bone, containing cartilage or bone cells.

la·cu′nal adj.
Histology A small, hollow chamber that houses an osteocyte in mature bone tissue or a chondrocyte in cartilage tissue
Medspeak A small pit, cavity, defect or gap

la·cu·na

, pl. lacunae (lă-kū'nă, -nē)
1. [TA] A small space, cavity, or depression.
2. A gap or defect.
3. An abnormal space between strata or between the cellular elements of the epidermis.
4. Synonym(s): corneal space.

lacuna

Any empty space, missing part, cavity or depression.

lacuna

a cavity or depression, for example, one of many small spaces between the lamellae of bones that is occupied by individual bone cells. Small canals (canaliculi) radiate from the lacunae and in these are small protoplasmic processes which connect with the osteoblasts in other lacunae. see HAVERSIAN CANAL.

la·cu·na

, pl. lacunae (lă-kū'nă, -nē)
1. [TA] Small space, cavity, or depression.
2. Gap or defect.
3. Abnormal space between strata or between the cellular elements of the epidermis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Irregular sized and empty lacunae can be seen (black arrows).
Histomorphometric analysis of the lacunae displayed a mean of 2.1 mm, 10.9 mm and 14.7 mm on the C, ER and PER groups respectively.
The compact bone is seen (*) with regular sized lacunae. The arrowheads are depicting regular osteocytes.
Note the large number of lacunae with signs of bone resorption at the edges, which are intensely stained (black arrowheads).
There are six abporal lacunae, no interporal lacunae, six paraporal lacunae, no polar lacunae and three poral lacunae.
There are six or no abporal lacunae, four, six, eight or no interporal lacunae, four or six paraporal lacunae, six polar lacunae and three or six poral lacunae.
There are six abporal lacunae, six interporal lacunae, no paraporal lacunae, six polar lacunae and no poral lacunae.
There are varying numbers of lacunae, 5-10 [micro]m in diameter.
Legal experts say there were a number of lacunae in the NAB case against the Sharifs and this led to their release on bail.
"It won't happen that you (NAB) create lacunae and we (judiciary) face the criticism."
Despite lacunae in the documentation (notably for the years 1494-1530, and 1658-86), we can follow the evolution of this confraternity from its foundation until its suppression; from its fairly obscure origins as a laudese fraternity primarily concerned with educating and protecting young "boys" (aged twelve to twenty), its growth into an important provider of religious theater and music (involving "youths" up to 30, and full adults), its later seventeenth- and eighteenth-century form as a sort of academy for an adult elite, sponsored by the Medici grand ducal family, and then its final demise under enlightenment attacks.
There are some bibliographical lacunae as well: Spencer contrasts Basin with Froissart's poetic instincts (200), but appears unaware of Gabrielle Spiegel's innovative study of the origins of vernacular prose historiography, while his treatment of Basin's legacy through the sixteenth century fails to cite William F.