Cori cycle

(redirected from lactic acid cycle)
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Co·ri cy·cle

(kō'rē),
the phases in the metabolism of carbohydrate: 1) glycogenolysis in the liver; 2) passage of glucose into the circulation; 3) deposition of glucose in the muscles as glycogen; 4) glycogenolysis during muscular activity and conversion to lactate, which is converted to glycogen in the liver. Also called lactic acid cycle.
Synonym(s): lactic acid cycle
[Carl F. Cori]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Co·ri cy·cle

(kō'rē sī'kĕl)
The phases in the metabolism of carbohydrate: 1) glycogenolysis in the liver; 2) passage of glucose into the circulation; 3) deposition of glucose in the muscles as glycogen; and 4) glycogenolysis during muscular activity and conversion to lactate, which is converted to glycogen in the liver.
[Carl F. Cori]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Cori cycle

a biochemical pathway that enables lactic acid produced in the skeletal muscles after exercise to be converted in the liver by GLUCONEOGENESIS to form glucose. The new glucose can either be passed back to muscles via the bloodstream to serve as an energy source, or be stored in the liver as glycogen. The two-way flow of products between muscle and liver was first described by Carl Cori (1896–1984).
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Cori,

Carl F., Czech-U.S. biochemist and Nobel laureate, 1896-1984.
Cori cycle - the phases in the metabolism of carbohydrate.
Cori ester - an important intermediate in glycogenesis and glycogenolysis. Synonym(s): D-glucose 1-phosphate
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012