lactate

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lactate

 [lak´tāt]
1. any salt of lactic acid or the anion of lactic acid.
2. to secrete milk.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lac·tate

(lak'tāt),
1. A salt or ester of lactic acid.
2. To produce milk in the mammary glands.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lactate 1

(lăk′tāt′)
intr.v. lac·tated, lac·tating, lac·tates
To secrete or produce milk.

lactate 2

(lăk′tāt′)
n.
A salt or ester of lactic acid.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

lactate

Emergency medicine A salt or ester of lactic acid; the time required to normalize lactate is a useful prognostic tool in trauma victims. Cf 'Kiss of death' test.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lac·tate

(lak'tāt)
1. A salt or ester of lactic acid.
2. To produce milk in the mammary glands.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lactate

Lactic acid in the ionized state.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Lactate builds up when you run above your anaerobic threshold.
Findings suggest that muscle cells use carbohydrates anaerobically for energy, producing lactate as a byproduct, but then burning it, too, as an additional fuel source.
Several regulatory controls are in place to protect the food supply from potential impurities/contaminants introduced through food additives such as sodium lactate. The U.S.
For example, the regulation that addresses sodium lactate can be found in Title 21, Code of Federal Regulations (Sodium Lactate, 2010), which classifies sodium lactate as GRAS (generally recognized as safe).
Previous studies compared the removal of blood lactate during land jogging or running and during immersed running (Nakanishi et al., 1999; Town and Bradley, 1991; Villar and Denadai, 1998).
These authors found that the accumulation of blood lactate during cycling exercise at intensities comprised between 40% and 80% of the peak oxygen uptake was not different when water immersion or land exercise were compared, but higher percentages resulted in lower blood lactate values for water immersion.
PURAC recently introduced PURASAL LITE, a lactate with 75 percent less sodium but with the same properties as sodium lactate.
Natural sodium and potassium lactate is affirmed by FDA as a GRAS substance for use as a direct human food ingredient.
In all the formulations, Patco compared this stabilizer with other calcium lactates, calcium stearates, synthetic hydrotalcite (SHT), zinc oxide and zinc stearate.
Patco says that in postreactor compounding of virgin resins, calcium lactate and calcium stearoyl lactate form harmless complexes with the titanium and aluminum catalyst residues left over from polymerization, preventing these Lewis-acid residues from reacting with the resin's primary and secondary antioxidants and thereby leaving the polymer vulnerable to degradation.
Intramuscular lactate may reach 15-25 mM after 30-120 second supramaximal bouts [11].
While our [[BLa.sup.-]] results concur with prior outcomes, much of the prior literature were collected from both supramaximal and continuous incremental cycle ergometry exercise done to volitional fatigue; as due to the novelty of the Impulse there is comparatively less lactate data from this exercise modality.