laceration


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laceration

 [las″ĕ-ra´shun]
1. the act of tearing.
2. a wound produced by the tearing of body tissue, as distinguished from a cut or incision. External lacerations may be small or large and may be caused in many ways, such as a blow from a blunt instrument, a fall against a rough surface, or an accident with machinery. Lacerations within the body occur when an organ is compressed or moved out of place by an external or internal force. This may result from a blow that does not penetrate the skin, and surgical repair is usually necessary.

lac·er·a·tion

(las'ĕr-ā'shŭn), A laceration is properly a tearing or rupturing of soft tissue (e.g., skin, brain, liver) by blunt trauma. Avoid extending this term to all open wounds, including incised wounds.
1. A torn or jagged wound, or an accidental cut wound.
2. The process or act of tearing the tissues.
[L. lacero, pp. -atus, to tear to pieces]

laceration

/lac·er·a·tion/ (las″er-a´shun)
1. the act of tearing.
2. a torn, ragged, mangled wound.

laceration

(lăs′ə-rā′shən)
n.
A jagged wound or cut.

laceration

[las′ərā′shən]
Etymology: L, lacerare, to tear
1 the act of tearing or slashing.
2 a torn, jagged wound. lacerate, v., lacerated, adj.
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Avulsed laceration

laceration

Shearing of a mucocutaneous or other surface, often with visible briding of connective tissue. See Cerebral laceration.

lac·er·a·tion

(las'ĕr-ā'shŭn)
1. A torn or jagged wound caused by blunt trauma; incorrectly used when describing a cut.
2. The process or act of tearing the tissues.
[L. lacero, pp. -atus, to tear to pieces]

laceration

(las?e-ra'shon)
Enlarge picture
LACERATION OF THE THUMB
A wound or irregular tear of the flesh. See: illustration

laceration of cervix

Bilateral, stellate, or unilateral tear of the cervix uteri caused by childbirth.

laceration of perineum

An injury of the perineum caused by childbirth. The lacerations may be classified as first-, second-, third-, or fourth-degree, depending on the extent of injury. A first-degree laceration may not require repair, but a fourth-degree laceration, which involves the vaginal mucosa, perineal muscles, and the sphincter ani, requires extensive repair.
See: episiotomy

stellate laceration

A tear in the skin or in an internal organ caused by blunt trauma. Several lines emanate outward from the tear's center.

laceration

A wound made by tearing. An irregular wound of the tissues, as distinct from a clean cut (incised wound).

Laceration

Also called a tear. Separation of skin or other tissue by a tremendous force, producing irregular edges.
Mentioned in: Fingertip Injuries, Wounds

laceration

torn/jagged cut/wound

lac·er·a·tion

(las'ĕr-ā'shŭn) Avoid using this term to describe all open wounds, including incised wounds.
1. Torn or jagged wound.
2. Act of tearing tissues.
[L. lacero, pp. -atus, to tear to pieces]

laceration,

n a wound produced by tearing; the process of tearing.

laceration

1. the act of tearing.
2. a wound produced by the tearing of body tissue, as distinguished from a cut or incision.

Patient discussion about laceration

Q. I am scheduled for scope surgery for a torn meniscus on my knee and what is the duration for recovery? Has anyone had this surgery for a torn meniscus? How did you deal with this recovery?

A. The recovery process is individual, and you cannot predict it in advance. I know someone who has done it and was able to go back to exercising regularly after 2 months. I would think the recovery from the surgery itself is a matter of few weeks until you can walk properly, however you should still give your knee a break and rest for a while after.

More discussions about laceration
References in periodicals archive ?
Incidents/Injuries: Philips has received 13 reports of the lens of the bulb shattering, including five reports of property damage totaling about $700 and two laceration injuries.
The woman, who was suffering from a reduced level of consciousness, received a leg injury and facial lacerations.
THE COURT REJECTED THE DEFENDANT'S ARGUMENT THAT THE TRIAL COURT ERRED IN DENYING ITS MOTIONS FOR A DIRECTED VERDICT AND JNOV BECAUSE THE PLAINTIFFS FAILED TO PROVE THAT LACERATION RESULTED IN THE AMPUTATION.
Pathologist Dr Keith McCarthy told the inquest: "The only significant trauma was a 20 millimetre deep laceration on the left side of the neck which was exposing the muscle.
Patients and providers should be informed of the potential drawbacks of epidural analgesia, including severe perineal laceration and its considerable long-term consequences, such as incontinence, dyspareunia, and rectovaginal fistula.
The victim suffered a one-inch laceration to the back of his head.
The spinning blade poses a serious laceration hazard to consumers,'' the commission said.
This may have stopped subcutaneous insufflation, improving compliance and incidentally sealing the laceration, which limited further extension of the subcutaneous emphysema.
Shane sustained a laceration to his liver and was rushed to the Mater hospital for emergency surgery.
Considering the necessary parameters for a laceration cover, optimization of the covers by using nanotechnology-based systems can result in a much better performance," he said, adding, "Polymeric nanofibers have wide applications especially in critical cases due to their very high ratio of surface to volume and their ability to determine diffusivity and to intelligently adjust the medicine release process.
They react with the mucous tissues causing their dissolution and the emission of deep heat that leads to the laceration of these tissues," he said.
19) The initial evaluation of a patient with eye trauma should begin with gross examination for laceration, swelling, or orbital rim step-off along with palpation of the globe.