laceration


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laceration

 [las″ĕ-ra´shun]
1. the act of tearing.
2. a wound produced by the tearing of body tissue, as distinguished from a cut or incision. External lacerations may be small or large and may be caused in many ways, such as a blow from a blunt instrument, a fall against a rough surface, or an accident with machinery. Lacerations within the body occur when an organ is compressed or moved out of place by an external or internal force. This may result from a blow that does not penetrate the skin, and surgical repair is usually necessary.

lac·er·a·tion

(las'ĕr-ā'shŭn), A laceration is properly a tearing or rupturing of soft tissue (e.g., skin, brain, liver) by blunt trauma. Avoid extending this term to all open wounds, including incised wounds.
1. A torn or jagged wound, or an accidental cut wound.
2. The process or act of tearing the tissues.
[L. lacero, pp. -atus, to tear to pieces]

laceration

/lac·er·a·tion/ (las″er-a´shun)
1. the act of tearing.
2. a torn, ragged, mangled wound.

laceration

(lăs′ə-rā′shən)
n.
A jagged wound or cut.

laceration

[las′ərā′shən]
Etymology: L, lacerare, to tear
1 the act of tearing or slashing.
2 a torn, jagged wound. lacerate, v., lacerated, adj.
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Avulsed laceration

laceration

Shearing of a mucocutaneous or other surface, often with visible briding of connective tissue. See Cerebral laceration.

lac·er·a·tion

(las'ĕr-ā'shŭn)
1. A torn or jagged wound caused by blunt trauma; incorrectly used when describing a cut.
2. The process or act of tearing the tissues.
[L. lacero, pp. -atus, to tear to pieces]

laceration

(las?e-ra'shon)
Enlarge picture
LACERATION OF THE THUMB
A wound or irregular tear of the flesh. See: illustration

laceration of cervix

Bilateral, stellate, or unilateral tear of the cervix uteri caused by childbirth.

laceration of perineum

An injury of the perineum caused by childbirth. The lacerations may be classified as first-, second-, third-, or fourth-degree, depending on the extent of injury. A first-degree laceration may not require repair, but a fourth-degree laceration, which involves the vaginal mucosa, perineal muscles, and the sphincter ani, requires extensive repair.
See: episiotomy

stellate laceration

A tear in the skin or in an internal organ caused by blunt trauma. Several lines emanate outward from the tear's center.

laceration

A wound made by tearing. An irregular wound of the tissues, as distinct from a clean cut (incised wound).

Laceration

Also called a tear. Separation of skin or other tissue by a tremendous force, producing irregular edges.
Mentioned in: Fingertip Injuries, Wounds

laceration

torn/jagged cut/wound

lac·er·a·tion

(las'ĕr-ā'shŭn) Avoid using this term to describe all open wounds, including incised wounds.
1. Torn or jagged wound.
2. Act of tearing tissues.
[L. lacero, pp. -atus, to tear to pieces]

laceration,

n a wound produced by tearing; the process of tearing.

laceration

1. the act of tearing.
2. a wound produced by the tearing of body tissue, as distinguished from a cut or incision.

Patient discussion about laceration

Q. I am scheduled for scope surgery for a torn meniscus on my knee and what is the duration for recovery? Has anyone had this surgery for a torn meniscus? How did you deal with this recovery?

A. The recovery process is individual, and you cannot predict it in advance. I know someone who has done it and was able to go back to exercising regularly after 2 months. I would think the recovery from the surgery itself is a matter of few weeks until you can walk properly, however you should still give your knee a break and rest for a while after.

More discussions about laceration
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on above conclusion we recommend use of absorbable sutures in paediatric group for laceration repair as it is cheaper, readily available in our emergency settings and gives a choice to the parents to prevent their child from psychological trauma of removal of stitches.
This is a prospective study carried out from July 1, 2014 to May 30, 2016 in a Tertiary Referral Care Center of Western India in 220 eyes having eyelid lacerations.
Eyelid lacerations are common in both dogs and cats because of their fighting habit.
From 1990 to 2006, facial lacerations were the most common ice hockey injury to present to the emergency department in the USA, representing 16.
03) in the left eye and upper lid; moreover, the overall mean [+ or -] SD of laceration length was 19.
Major Finding: Nineteen percent of women who had vaginal delivery and anal sphincter laceration met the criteria for AI according to the EPIQ.
tracheal lacerations secondary to endotracheal intubation.
Another 415 patients were told to keep the laceration covered and dry for 12 hours, and then to resume their normal activities including bathing.
That laceration was down to the left jugular vein and was perfectly in line with the vein and had split the wall of the vein.
The rate of anal sphincter laceration during vaginal delivery has sharply declined in recent years, paralleling modifications in obstetric practice, a University of Southern California study revealed.
Researchers also interviewed the drivers of vehicles in which a child suffered an injury requiring treatment, such as a concussion, laceration, broken limb, or internal-organ injury.
The extent of the officers' contact consisted of three punches and two shoves, and the inmate's injuries consisted of a broken facial pimple, swollen areas on the cheekbone, and a small laceration on the bridge of his nose.