labyrinthine concussion

labyrinthine concussion

ENT Trauma implicated in peripheral vestibular damage, often associated with variable hearing loss due to blunt head trauma or barotrauma; vestibular and auditory complaints are usually transient; spontaneous resolution is the norm; persistent Sx are attributed to 2º endolymphatic hydrops; labyrinthine hemorrhage may trigger inflammation, leading to fibrosis and ossification, ergo audiovestibular dysfunction. See Concussion.
References in periodicals archive ?
The TBI associated with TAs can cause dizziness via a number of different mechanisms, including labyrinthine concussion, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), and perilymphatic fistula [5].
Dizziness can be caused by a number of different mechanisms following TAs, including BPPV, labyrinthine concussion, whiplash injury, perilymphatic fistula, traumatic endolymphatic hydrops, and central lesions such as brain concussion, hemorrhage, and diffuse axonal injury [1,5].
Labyrinthine concussion is also a common cause of post traumatic dizziness [5, 11].
Blunt trauma to the head can cause persistent problems with dizziness and balance via a variety of vestibular system problems such as labyrinthine concussion, rupture of the round window membrane, delayed endolymphatic hydrops, and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo due to canalolithiasis [13].
In approximately 20% of patients, the condition is secondary to a labyrinthine concussion, chronic suppurative otitis media, or ear surgery--stapes surgery, in particular.