labyrinth

(redirected from labyrinthian)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

labyrinth

 [lab´ĭ-rinth]
the inner ear, consisting of the vestibule, cochlea, and semicircular canals. The cochlea is concerned with hearing and the vestibule and semicircular canals with the sense of equilibrium. (See also color plates.) adj., adj labyrin´thine. 

The bony portion of the labyrinth (osseous labyrinth) is composed of a series of canals tunneled out of the temporal bone. Inside the osseous labyrinth is the membranous labyrinth, which conforms to the general shape of the osseous labyrinth but is much smaller. A fluid called perilymph fills the space (perilymphatic space) between the osseous and membranous labyrinths. Fluid inside the membranous labyrinth is called endolymph. These fluids play an important role in the transmission of sound waves and the maintenance of body balance. The membranous labyrinth is divided into two parts: the cochlear labyrinth, which includes the perilymphatic space and the cochlear duct, and the vestibular labyrinth, which includes the utricle, saccule, and semicircular canals.

Disorders of the inner ear, such as labyrinthitis and meniere's disease, are characterized by episodes of dizziness, tinnitus, and hearing loss.
ethmoid labyrinth (ethmoidal labyrinth) either of the paired lateral masses of the ethmoid bone, consisting of numerous thin-walled cellular cavities, the ethmoidal cells.

lab·y·rinth

(lab'i-rinth), [TA] Any of several anatomic structures with numerous intercommunicating cells or canals.
1. The internal or inner ear, composed of the semicircular ducts, vestibule, and cochlea.
2. Any group of communicating cavities, as in each lateral mass of the ethmoid bone.
3. A group of upright test tubes terminating below in a base of communicating, alternately ⊔-shaped and ⊓-shaped tubes, used for isolating motile from nonmotile organisms in culture, or a motile from a less motile organism (as the typhoid from the colon bacillus), the former traveling faster and farther through the tubes than the latter.

labyrinth

(lăb′ə-rĭnth′)
n.
1.
a. An intricate structure of interconnecting passages through which it is difficult to find one's way; a maze.
b. Labyrinth Greek Mythology The maze in which the Minotaur was confined.
2. A design consisting of a single unbranching but highly convoluted path leading from the outside to the center of a usually circular or square space.
3. Something highly intricate or convoluted in character, composition, or construction: a labyrinth of rules and regulations.
4. Anatomy
a. A group of complex interconnecting anatomical cavities.
b. See inner ear.

lab·y·rinth

(labi-rinth) [TA]
1. The internal or inner ear, composed of the semicircular ducts, vestibule, and cochlea.
2. Any group of communicating cavities, as in each lateral mass of the ethmoid bone.
3. A group of communicating culture tubes used for separating motile from nonmotile microorganisms.

labyrinth

Any group of communicating anatomical cavities, especially the internal ear, comprizing the vestibule, semicircular canals and the cochlea.

Labyrinth

The bony cavity of the inner ear.
Mentioned in: Labyrinthitis

lab·y·rinth

(labi-rinth) [TA]
Internal or inner ear, composed of the semicircular ducts, vestibule, and cochlea.
References in periodicals archive ?
No other Western movie in the last generation or so approaches this notable film in its ambitious, provocative treatment of the labyrinthian realities of western life.
The setting remains a long shot of a graceful labyrinthian picturesque garden where we see glimpses of happy social life (a party) in the distance.
To say that labyrinthian sentence constructions and repeated references to Greek mythology strike a cheesy note to contemporary ears but not to the original audiences still says nothing about the actual quality of what was written.There is a phenomenon known as bad, pretentious, and overliterary writing.
Wittgenstein's pursuit of the myriad and labyrinthian ramifications of the conceptual confusions surrounding the Augustinian picture of language has generated a monument of philosophical exegesis.
Here the prophetic, opening nightmare vision of the Beloved's half-open tomb and the subsequent waking confirmation of her death provoke a courageous, self-imposed resolve on the part of the male speaker to embark, as I write in "Beginnings in Endings," on "a labyrinthian journey through the maze of his own death anxiety"--a journey in which he "restages the classic Petrarchan drama of temporality and yet cannot comfortably incorporate its conventional, transcendent rhetorical solutions." (8) Ronsard's lyric speaker thus struggles in this sequence "to position himself between the authoritative pull toward a traditional mythology of union and renascence" (1-2) and the unrelenting image of the tomb--of sepulchral spaces--elaborated in his own dream work and in his poetic imagination.
These labyrinthian moves and sequential dispossessions are also central to the autobiographical sequel Almost a Woman, which Santiago begins with a depiction of her dispossession and travels inside both Puerto Rico and New York.
Guidebooks had, of course, become a standard urban genre by this time, textualizing the city and reading its topography, an antidote to the dangers of the labyrinthian urbs.
It ruled against the plaintiffs for essentially the same reason as the federal court, noting for example that "it is undisputed that at least five of the districts are 'safe seats' for Democratic candidates, thus further undermining Petitioners' claim that Democrats have been entirely shut out of the political process." (64) While the Bandemer opinion itself has been described as "murky" (65) with "labyrinthian twists and turns," (66) the message resulting from its application seems crystal clear--Bandemer is a constraint in theory, not in fact.
A guided tour through its labyrinthian interior takes you to the world's most powerful water-driven turbine generators located within the largest man-made cavern in Europe.
To mark the publication of Rice's second novel, The Snow Garden--a labyrinthian tale of murder and secret sexual liaisons among a group of college freshmen [see review, page 63]--The Advocate invited the two writers to get together again to discuss their common interests; Rice's successful emergence from the shadow of his famous mother, Anne Rice; and what's wrong with young gay men today.
As he explains in a recent essay that itself might have formed a fine introduction to a separate edition of Harlem Gallery, Tolson's last poem with "its extensive and precise learnedness and uncompromising obscurities, its syncopations of puns, neologisms, double negatives, labyrinthian syntax, and acrobatic prosody...
In contrast, the Court's standing decisions in the environmental area serve to stop many genuinely interested would-be plaintiffs from bringing citizen suits altogether, and the unpredictable course of the decisions may both confuse lower courts and leave some claimants who deserve standing, even under the Court's labyrinthian doctrines, without it.