labour

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la·bor

, stages of labor (lā'bŏr, stājĕz)
The process of expulsion of the fetus and the placenta from the uterus. The stages of labor are: first stage, beginning with the onset of uterine contractions through the period of dilation of the os uteri; second stage, the period of expulsive effort, beginning with complete dilation of the cervix and ending with expulsion of the infant; third stage, or placental stage, the period beginning at the expulsion of the infant and ending with the completed expulsion of the placenta and membranes.
Synonym(s): labour.
[L. toil, suffering]

labour

The three stage process of delivering a baby and the PLACENTA by contractions of the muscles of the womb (uterus), of the DIAPHRAGM and of the wall of the abdomen. The first stage lasts from the onset of pains to full widening (dilatation) of the CERVIX, the second to the delivery of the baby and the third to the delivery of the placenta.

labour

the process or effort by which a baby and the placenta are expelled from the UTERUS.
References in periodicals archive ?
He is relishing the freedom of stand-up after the laboriousness of a show with 40 people, and adds, perhaps surprisingly, that he never wants to do anything else which has as high a profile as Jerry Springer.
Like last season's "Sly Fox," it shows the dusty laboriousness of underaccelerated farce.
Such language further emphasizes the laboriousness and unnaturalness of the Hungarian attempt to imitate their German teachers in the arts of war.
Bereft of people, who are relegated to peering in through the cracks between the wooden planks of the carousel, it becomes trapped within its own laboriousness, pathetically parodying the grandiose memorial next to which it is situated.
The importance of work to Buffon and his associates was echoed in the eulogies of savants in which "laboriousness and zeal" were stressed, qualities equally valued by revolutionaries (32-33).
But the interviews are saved from laboriousness by the interviewer, Richard Canning, who changes the pace and shifts topics frequently.
In further describing Tyndale, Frith, and Barnes as worthy successors of fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Lollards, Foxe contrasts the mechanical reproduction of a multitude of books with the laboriousness of copying manuscripts out by hand.
The overwhelming impression is of a curious melange of carelessness, listlessness, laboriousness and haste, of a wearied haul to get to the word minimum (as witnessed by the word-count numbers on rough drafts).
Under the centralized wage system, earnings differentials between sectors of the economy and between occupations were shaped by an administrative perception of their laboriousness, productivity, and social usefulness.
An anxiety about belatedness may be behind some of the book's laboriousness, but another possible cause allows us to see how this had the potential to be not only a very good biography, but also a distinctive contribution to Keats studies.
When that falters, and when Jones relies on Harlan's narrative voice alone, with its unedited veerings into garrulity and laboriousness, I found myself losing track of the writer's initial vision.