laboratory error

laboratory error

any error made by the personnel in a clinical laboratory in performing a test, interpreting data, or reporting or recording the results. Laboratory error must always be considered a possible explanation for findings that are at variance with the composite clinical condition of the patient or are widely divergent from previous laboratory tests. The general procedure is to repeat the test when an abnormal result is found.
References in periodicals archive ?
Q We have been trying to determine an acceptable quality threshold for laboratory error rate.
Because the detection limit and specificity of less than three repetitions were poor and because there is always the possibility of laboratory error, it follows that the minimum standard in very low- or very high-risk cases should be three repetitions.
In 2001, medical centers in Michigan, New Jersey, Georgia, and Illinois took advantage of advanced technology to deter specimen mislabeling--a common cause of laboratory error.
Although the reported laboratory error rate of 5 incorrect results per 1000 tests seems commendable and is one-tenth that of clinical healthcare overall, it is also 10 to 100 times greater than is tolerated in almost any other industry.
Moreover, the lack of a universally accepted definition of error and above all of "allowable error rate", reduces the possibility of evaluating the impact of laboratory error on patient outcomes.
3] from each patient; abnormally low or high values may indicate laboratory error.
This growing body of research on laboratory error sources and emphasis on patient safety creates a challenge for laboratory management to address while at the same time juggling shrinking budgets and personnel constraints.
Phlebotomy (the drawing of blood) is a multistep process which affects the quality of the specimen and is thus important for preventing laboratory error, patient injury and even death.
Our previous survey of pathologists and laboratory directors confirmed that few pathologists report personally disclosing pathology or laboratory error to patients.
The significantly increased free and total calcium concentrations reported from the laboratory were found to be accurate and interestingly therapeutic in nature, rather than reflecting a primary disease state or laboratory error.
In an asymptomatic person, a test result should be repeated "when feasible", to rule out a laboratory error.

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