labor market


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labor market

A place where labor is exchanged for wages; an LM is defined by geography, education and technical expertise, occupation, licensure or certification requirements, and job experience
References in periodicals archive ?
DAMASCUS, (SANA) -- The Syrian Ministry of Social Affairs and Labor launched the Labor Market Report for 2009-2010, in cooperation with the Central Bureau of Statistics and the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) as a first step towards establishing the National Labor Market Observatory.
In every labor market, workers and firms are regulated by institutions and policies that affect these flow rates, such as minimum wages, unemployment insurance, severance pay, advance notice, labor taxes, and so on.
Adding to the toxic brew in Turkey, punishingly high taxes on wages also contribute to the dysfunction of Turkey's labor market.
The persistent theme in this paper is that key tenets of the traditional labor market model have been altered in recent years and that prior labor market benchmarks are outmoded.
The research reviewed for the story on Finland mentioned that labor market flexibility tends to promote employment.
These findings raise the question of whether the career guidance role might be split off, both to protect its resources and to address its distinctive competence requirements, including knowledge of the labor market.
Aggregate spending, despite high energy prices, appears to have strengthened since late winter, and labor market conditions continue to improve gradually.
Without a doubt, racial discrimination remains a problem to some degree in labor markets and other aspects of American society.
In Chapters 2 and 3, the authors document what happened to the early postwar norm and portray the emergence of the "new" labor market over the past 30 years.
For labor historians, he documents the workings of the labor market and its implications in the daily lives of the immigrant workers and their dependents, but he also probes the interstices between these markets and legal and state structures, business organizations, and the workers' own ethnic cultures, organizations, and movements.
The idea that labor markets might work like other markets, that workers might sort themselves out according to their own preferences among packages offered by different employers, is antithetical to the still-prevailing New Deal belief system.