labile


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labile

 [la´bīl]
1. gliding; moving from point to point over the surface.
2. unstable; fluctuating.
3. chemically unstable.

la·bile

(lā'bīl, -bil), Do not confuse this word with labial. Unstable; unsteady, not fixed; denoting:
1. An adaptability to alteration or modification, that is, relatively easily changed or rearranged.
2. Certain constituents of serum affected by increases in heat.
3. An electrode that is kept moving over the surface during the passage of an electric current.
4. In psychology or psychiatry, denoting free and uncontrolled mood or behavioral expression of the emotions.
5. Easily removable, for example, a labile hydrogen atom.
[L. labilis, liable to slip, fr. labor, pp. lapsus, to slip]

labile

/la·bile/ (la´bīl)
1. gliding; moving from point to point over the surface; unstable; fluctuating.
2. chemically unstable.

labile

(lā′bīl′, -bəl)
adj.
1. Open to change; readily changeable or unstable: labile chemical compounds; tissues with labile cell populations.
2. Fluctuating widely: labile hypertension; labile emotions.
3. Decomposing readily: the labile component of organic matter.

la·bil′i·ty (-bĭl′ĭ-tē) n.

labile

[lā′bil]
Etymology: L, labilis, slipping
1 unstable; characterized by a tendency to change or be altered or modified.
2 (in psychiatry) characterized by rapidly shifting or changing emotions, as in bipolar disorder and certain types of schizophrenia; emotionally unstable. lability, n.

labile

adjective Psychology Moody, volatile

la·bile

(lā'bīl)
Unstable; unsteady, not fixed; denoting: (1) an adaptability to alteration or modification, i.e., relatively easily changed or rearranged; (2) constituents of serum affected by increases in heat; (3) an electrode that is kept moving over the surface during the passage of an electric current; (4) psychology Free and uncontrolled mood or behavioral expression of the emotions; (5) easily removable (e.g., a labile hydrogen atom).
[L. labilis, liable to slip, fr. labor, pp. lapsus, to slip]

labile

Liable to change. The term is applied to the emotions as well as to physiological change.

labile

liable to chemical or other change.

la·bile

(lā'bīl) Do not confuse this word with labial.
1. An adaptability to alteration or modification.
2. Constituents of serum affected by increases in heat.
3. Easily removable, e.g., a labile hydrogen atom.
[L. labilis, liable to slip, fr. labor, pp. lapsus, to slip]

labile (lā´bīl),

adj unstable, as labile fever.

labile

1. gliding; moving from point to point over the surface; unstable; fluctuating.
2. chemically unstable.
References in periodicals archive ?
Labile hemoglobin A1c: unexpected indicator of preanalytical contraindications.
For all soils, total C was positively correlated with total N and labile C.
Inactivation of the acid labile subunit gene in mice results in mild retardation of postnatal growth despite profound disruptions in the circulating insulin-like growth factor system.
This topic shows even in kinds with close relationship the labile period is different Piffer [33] believe that labile period in florid oncorhynchus mykiss is in some time as altive nutrition during 1 month.
Labile fertiliser Mn in the innermost sections of the both soils was significantly greater for the soils treated with fluid Mn fertiliser than those treated with granular Mn fertiliser (Fig.
Structure of the hemagglutinin precursor cleavage site, a determinant of influenza pathogenicity and the origin of the labile conformation.
Therefore, environmental factors that affect DNA methylation patterning during development can potentially influence adult phenotype via alterations in CpG methylation at epigenetically labile regions in the genome.
They found that more labile selection methods (such as radioactivity-based random number generators) produced larger effect sizes than less labile ones (such as pseudorandom sources and random number tables), although this trend failed to achieve significance.
Alex Brown in his chapter "Redbeds: source of metals for sediment-hosted stratiform copper sandstone copper, sandstone lead, and sandstone uranium-vanadium deposits" reviews conventional genetic models for the deposit types listed in the title, illustrated by some case examples, For all deposit types, the ore-forming process involves the early oxidative diagenesis of first-cycle continental clastic sediments; the leaching of metals from labile minerals by saline groundwaters; and the transport of the metals by groundwater flow to a reductive subsurface environment, such as beds containing organic detritus or digenetic pyrite, where the metals are precipitated.
Produced at ambient or sub-ambient temperatures, the extracts maintain their natural character by retaining nearly all of their volatile or thermally labile components, which improve the odour or taste profile of the final extract.
Further, we know that the test scores of preschoolers are notoriously labile.
Although the Norwalk virus is heat labile, time/temperature inactivation is certain only at boiling (100[degrees]C).