label

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label

 [la´b'l]
something that identifies; an identifying mark or tag.
radioactive label a radioisotope that is incorporated into a compound to mark it.

la·bel

(lā'bĕl),
1. To incorporate into a compound a substance that is readily detected, such as a radionuclide, whereby its metabolism can be followed or its physical distribution detected.
See also: package insert.
2. The substance so incorporated.
See also: package insert.
3. Any display of written, printed, or graphic materials accompanying a pharmaceutical or a medical device at any time while such is in interstate commerce or offered for sale; often used as a synonym for package insert (q.v.).
See also: package insert.

label

/la·bel/ (la´b'l)
1. a mark, tag, or other characteristic that identifies something.
2. to provide something with such a characteristic.

radioactive label  a radioisotope that is incorporated into a compound to mark it.

label

Etymology: ME, band
1 n, a substance with a special affinity for an organ, tissue, cell, or microorganism in which it may become deposited and fixed.
2 n, an atom or molecule attached to either a ligand or binding protein and capable of generating a signal for monitoring in the binding reaction.
3 v, to deposit and fix a substance, tissue, cell, or microorganism.
4 v, to attach a radioisotope to a compound for the purpose of tracing it during a physiological action in the body.

label

A description of a drug product or device provided by the manufacturer and approved by the regulatory authority of a particular country or jurisdiction, which includes indications for its use, who should use it, adverse events, instructions for use, and safety information.

label

Pharmacology A display of written, printed or graphic matter upon a container or article; all information placed on the container must, in the case of medications, also be placed on the product's outside container or wrapper

la·bel

(lā'bĕl)
1. To incorporate into a compound a substance that is readily detected, such as a radionuclide, whereby its metabolism can be followed or its physical distribution detected.
2. The substance so incorporated.

label

any marker, often a radioactive atom (TRACER), that makes it possible to locate and monitor a particular molecule or organism.

la·bel

(sig) (lā'bĕl)
To incorporate into a compound a substance that is readily detected, whereby its metabolism can be followed or its physical distribution detected.

label (lā´bəl),

n 1. the portion of the prescription in which the directions for use are stated.
2. one or more characters used to identify an item of data. Also called
key. See also signa.

label

something that identifies; an identifying mark, tag, etc.

radioactive label
radioactive tracer.

Patient discussion about label

Q. Provide me some examples of food labels and nutrition calculations. Hello, Can any one provide me some examples of food labels and nutrition calculations?

A. I have given some 5 basic questions and answers which are related to food labels and nutrition calculations. Hope you will find it useful:

1. How many calories would you consume if you ate the entire bag?
90 calories x 4 servings = 360 calories

2. What is the total amount of calories that come from fat in the entire bag?
30 calories from fat x 4 servings = 120 calories

3. What is the percentage of calories that come from fat in the entire bag?
120 calories from fat ÷ 360 calories = 33%

4. How many calories per serving come from carbohydrates?
13 g Carbohydrates x 4 calories = 52 calories

5. How many calories per serving come from protein?
3 g Protein x 4 calories = 12 calories

Hope you find is useful.

More discussions about label
References in classic literature ?
I don't believe any of you suffer as I do," cried Amy, "for you don't have to go to school with impertinent girls, who plague you if you don't know your lessons, and laugh at your dresses, and label your father if he isn't rich, and insult you when your nose isn't nice.
X had ordered the dinner, and when the wine came on, he picked up a bottle, glanced at the label, and then turned to the grave, the melancholy, the sepulchral head waiter and said it was not the sort of wine he had asked for.
He examined the labels while I held folded hat and naked light.
He had been annoyed because a box, containing some clothes specially chosen by him for her to wear, had been taken to the wrong station, owing to her neglect in the matter of labels.
I suppose you didn't make the boxes neither, nor yet the labels," he said to me in the voice of one shorn of belief in everything.
There were bundles of labels, cupboards, and drawers with compartments, and wire guards for the cupboards, to allow free access to the air whilst keeping out slugs, mice, dormice, and rats, all of them very curious fanciers of tulips at two thousand francs a bulb.
The Baron's furnaces and retorts, and other things, were all there to speak for themselves, together with some packages of chemicals, having the name and address of the person who had supplied them plainly visible on their labels.
I took out first a loose bundle of ornamental cards, each containing the list of dishes at past banquets given or attended by the Major in London or Paris; next, a box full of delicately tinted quill pens (evidently a lady's gift); next, a quantity of old invitation cards; next, some dog's-eared French plays and books of the opera; next, a pocket-corkscrew, a bundle of cigarettes, and a bunch of rusty keys; lastly, a passport, a set of luggage labels, a broken silver snuff-box, two cigar-cases, and a torn map of Rome.
He worked as a night watchman, hawked potatoes on the street, pasted labels in a cannery warehouse, was utility man in a paper-box factory, and water-carrier for a street railway construction gang, and even joined the Dishwashers' Union just before it fell to pieces.
His work was to cover the pots of paste-blacking, tie them down neatly and paste on the labels.
It was only once, but as I sat with the distressed Fyne who had suddenly resuscitated his name buried in my memory with other dead labels of the past, I may say I saw him again, I saw him with great vividness of recollection, as he appeared in the days of his glory or splendour.
She labels it with meanings from start to finish; turns it into literature.