kymograph


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ky·mo·graph

(kī'mō-graf),
An obsolete instrument for recording wavelike motions or modulation, especially for recording variations in blood pressure; it consists of a drum usually revolved by clockwork and covered with smoked paper upon which the curve is inscribed by a stylet or other writing point.
[G. kyma, wave, + graphō, to record]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

kymograph

(kī′mə-grăf′)
n.
An instrument for recording variations in pressure, as of the blood, or in tension, as of a muscle, by means of a pen or stylus that marks a rotating drum.

ky′mo·graph′ic adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ky·mo·graph

(kī'mō-graf)
An instrument for recording wavelike motions or modulation of body organs (e.g., heart, great blood vessels); it consists of a drum revolved by clockwork and covered with smoked paper on which the curve is inscribed by a writing point.
[G. kyma, wave, + graphō, to record]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

kymograph

the revolving drum used in investigations of the physiology of nerves and muscles. Usually, it is capable of rotating at different known speeds and carries a piece of graph paper on which a trace is produced by a lever connected to the physiological preparation.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
As the patient breaths in and out, the piston is displaced back and forth with either a pen and kymograph or potentiometer attached to record volume displacement and flow.
(26) Building on previous theoretical work--Fourier's analysis of harmonics, Ohm's physics of musical sounds, and "Muller's law of specific nerve energies"--Helmholtz innovated acoustical research not only by providing ample "supporting experimental evidence" but also by devising and using in his laboratories a collection of tuning forks and resonators, as well as specially adapted instruments such as the kymograph, to isolate, amplify, and record all manner of "rapid elastic vibrations" (from the sounds of stringed musical instruments to those of real and synthesized voices) (Green and Butler, pp.