karat

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ka·rat

(karăt)
Measure of gold content of an alloy out of a possible 24 units (i.e., 24 units is pure gold).
[Ar. qirat]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The only source of window to the inside and outside world was KT. During my pre-teens, KT helped instil the habit of reading headlines and was instrumental in building my vocabulary.
However, integrated KT received a greater number of responses for current and future projects (n = 30; n = 24) when compared to end-of-grant KT. End-of-grant KT speaks specifically to the "dissemination of findings generated from research once a project is completed, depending on the extent to which there are mature findings appropriate for dissemination," most often involving the publication of findings in peer-reviewed journals and presenting at conferences and workshops (CIHR, 2010, p.
Instead they thought that pairing terms or using multiple terms would be a more productive way to address the complexity of KT. As one participant explained, this would allow different terms to be used to describe different stages or aspects of the process:
(21.) Goh KT. Dengue-a remerging infectious disease in Singapore.
In Western Europe, SR growth was moderate at 1.6% to 1,811 kt. North America also experienced moderate growth of 1.1% at 2,494 kt.
Crude ore production amounted to 814 kt. 347 kt waste rock was excavated.
As a result, they note that the field has focused on more dynamic representations of KT. There is greater attention to KT as a social, iterative phenomenon with attention to the interaction between people.
"I love reading KT. I run anaccounting and auditing firm and the series of stories run by KT on VAT (value-added tax) were very useful in my line of work," Manikandan said.
With virtual reality hardware, those at home can also enjoy a live visual experience of Olympic matches, according to KT.
More recently, Lane and Rogers (2011) used a multiple case study approach to examine the role of national health organizations in KT. Organizations were chosen for their representation of key stakeholder groups, which spanned industry, clinicians, consumers, researchers, and public policy.