knuckle

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knuckle

 [nuk´'l]
the dorsal aspect of any interphalangeal joint, or any similarly bent structure.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

knuck·le

(nŭk'ĕl),
1. A joint of a finger when the fist is closed, especially a metacarpophalangeal joint.
2. A kink or loop of intestine, as in a hernia.
[M.E. knokel]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

knuckle

(nŭk′əl)
n.
a. The prominence of the dorsal aspect of a joint of a finger, especially of one of the joints connecting the fingers to the hand.
b. A rounded protuberance formed by the bones in a joint.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

knuck·le

(nŭk'ĕl)
1. A joint of a finger when the fist is closed, especially a metacarpophalangeal joint.
2. A kink or loop of intestine, as in a hernia.
[M.E. knokel]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

knuckle

The common name for a finger joint.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Jekyll wakes up from "a comfortable morning doze" to discover that his hand, which is usually "large, firm, white and comely," is now "lean, corded, knuckly, of a dusky pallor, and thickly shaded with a swart growth of hair" (47)--a transformation that leaves him in a state of terror, especially since it has taken place against his will and without administration of the necessary drug.
The light, as if advancing her succour, falls successively on St Peter's bald pate and thickset shoulders, on his knuckly fingers, on the angel's peach-textured hand, and on the primrose virginal breast of St Agatha with its bleeding wound.
His wildness is also signified metonymically by his hand, described as "lean, corded, knuckly, of a dusky pallor, and thickly shaded with a swart growth of hair" (88).