knucklebone


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knucklebone

(nŭk′əl-bōn′)
n.
A knobbed bone, as of a knuckle or joint.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
DNA and radiocarbon testing of collagen from the knucklebone show that the remains likely belonged to a Middle Eastern man who lived in the first century A.D., which fits with the story of John the Baptist.
But the dead or the near dead are now all knucklebone. Whoever is alone will stay alone.
SATURDAY - The Luci Baines Band (Greenock), Lucid (Glasgow), Toaster (Glasgow), Spacehopper (Glasgow), Boomerang (Airdrie), Knucklebone (Glasgow), Arc (Airdrie), Easy (East Kilbride).
The three principal types are: naturally irregular objects, particularly the knucklebone (astragalos, talus, arra) but also shells; many-sided artefacts, especially the cubical die (kubos, tessera, talus) though dice of various shapes, such as dodecahedral, are known; and two-sided artefacts, including rectangular and circular counters (pettos, kleros, calculus, tessera).
He discovered a knucklebone beneath an upholstered chair, where Grace must have stored it.
knucklebone, eyelash, and tooth to the wind and rain.
Poor Mrs Schiff is given a fist--no fingers--like an over-cooked knucklebone. Only in the portrait of Edith Sitwell are the hands wilfully omitted, her arms terminating in tapering tubes of red and yellow fabric: a cruel irony given that her hands were the only part of her anatomy of which she was proud.
But The Scullery Maid and The Cellar Boy differ from the paintings on which Fried's discussion of Chardin rests--paintings of readers, artists sketching, children playing knucklebones, blowing bubbles, building houses of cards--because, in those, the central figure's attention is absorbed in the activity they are undertaking: activities that are unproductive but nonetheless pursued with a concentration which is fully engaged.
By eschewing interior games like carrom, cards or knucklebones, Sen fails to account for the role of women in the history of sports and games especially during the ancient and medieval periods.
The game, also knows as knucklebones, was a playground sensation.
The author has organized the main body of her text alphabetically by topical entry, covering a wide variety of sports and activities from around the world, including Aussie rule football, bull running, conkers, dwile flonking, extreme ironing, foxhunting, glima, hurling, jacks and knucklebones, korfball, lawnmower racing, Mongolian wrestling, Nordic walking, orienteering and regaining, pancake races, quidditch, rounderAEs, shin kicking, trampolining, underwater hockey, volcano boarding, wife carrying, yoga, zorbing, and many others.