knotweed


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Related to knotweed: giant knotweed

knotweed

polygonumaviculare.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Treatment of japanese knotweed at the newly purchased site for the london cancer hub.
Anderson also admitted that since August floods, (right) the ground has been infested by Japanese Knotweed, a rapidly-growing plant, which could take between five to 10 years to treat.
He went on to set up his own company, Japanese Knotweed Removal Wales (JKRW) and recently formed a partnership with a licensed drone operator to survey infestations.
But a survey carried out after he decided to sell up and move back to Spain revealed the extent of the problem caused by knotweed.
A Network Rail spokesman said: "Once reported to us, Japanese knotweed growing on our land and within 7m of our neighbours' is included in a chemical treatment cycle until there is no knotweed growth.
The man they sent said he would spray chemicals on the knotweed, "But this would still mean my garden is out of bounds for at least three years.
Initially, I thought it was a normal weed but as soon as I realised it was knotweed I called the council.
Himalayan balsam can be pulled up by the roots but Japanese knotweed is notoriously difficult to remove.
The letter says: "Whilst it is not illegal to have Japanese knotweed in your garden, owners have a legal responsibility to take control of the weed so as to restrict its spread into other residents' gardens.
Japanese knotweed is a tall, hardy herbaceous perennial, also known under the scientific names Fallopia japonica and Reynoutria japonica.
However not all of the cases were subsequently confirmed as Japanese knotweed.
Japanese Knotweed is a strong, clump-forming perennial with bamboo-like stems, leaves of up to 14cm in length and 15cm tassels of flowers in late summer and early autumn.