kite


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

kite

a member of the family Accipitridae, subfamily Aegypiinae (Old World vultures), which steal prey from other raptors. They are slim, with long narrow wings and an elongated tail. There are a number of genera, e.g. Milvus and Haliastur spp.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mike Madden, 45, of Honley, who organised the fly-in, said: "There's a safety issue but everybody here is intelligent enough not to fly their kite near power lines.
The Kite Fighters, Bantam Doubleday Dell, New York 2002
I heard recently that a farmer blamed the absence of hares these days on red Kites eating their leverets.
Kites fill the sky over Fort Perch Rock, in New Brighton, ahead of the International Kite Festival Picture: PAUL HEAPS/ ph090611postcard
He explained that the kite flyers would be showing a large variety of kites, from small, highly manoeuvrable models to some surprisingly large shapes and sizes, measuring as large as 50m by 10m.
Dee Troup, British expatriate, had brought along her two-year-old daughter Maddie to the festival as the little one joined her parents with a small kite of her own.
Our line went slack and I watched as the kite drifted slowly to the ground.
IN July 1987, The Evening Chronicle was flying high with a story about Europe's biggest ever kite festival - Gone With The Wind.
You can fly your kite any day that the weather is suitable.
One piece in particular is an inflating pink artwork made from ripstop, the material used in kite making," says mima's education officer Vicky Sturrs, pictured left.
After treatment with the coating, the kite will snap and crackle like it used to, be clean and perfectly water-repellent.
The kite is strapped to a harness around his chest, on the back of which is a small handle.