kin

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kin

(kĭn)
n.
1.
a. (used with a pl. verb) One's relatives or family: visited my aunt and her kin.
b. A relative or family member: Is she kin of yours?
2. (used with a pl. verb) Organisms that are genetically related to another or others: cauliflower and its kin.
adj.
Related genetically or in the same family.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Drawing on documents from the Casa de Huerfanos, Milanich argues that the state helped produce paternalistic relationships between kinless children and adults by endorsing seemingly benevolent institutions, such as charities and the Church, to take in children.
It moved more vigorously in those cases where assailants were kinless and friendless--that is to say, without power.
Actually he did not lose ita mistrial in the fall court term, an acquittal in the following spring term--the defendant a solid, well-to-do farmer, husband, and father, too, named Bookwright, from a section called Frenchman's Bend in the remote southeastern corner of the county; the victim a swaggering bravo calling himself Buck Thorpe and called Bucksnort by the other young men whom he had subjugated with his fists during the three years he had been in Frenchman's Bend; kinless, who had appeared overnight from nowhere, a brawler, a gambler, known to be a distiller of illicit whiskey and caught once on the road to Memphis with a small drove of stolen cattle, which the owner promptly identified.
On its most basic level, close-kin ownership throws into doubt the understanding among leading theoreticians of slavery that the slave was a deracinated outsider, a kinless being who could not reproduce socially (Miller 1988:45; 9 Watson 1980:6, 8).
forced a "rupture" in this binary system of national and regional identity, a rupture that functions as "a key marker of modernity in the history of the United States." In Faulkner's fiction, this rupture is signaled most obviously in Ike McCaslin's fretting over an American future in which "Chinese and African and Aryan and Jew all breed and spawn together until no man has time to say which one is which nor cares," and in Chick Mallison's apprehensive description, in a novel published three years after the Brown decision, of Jefferson's lone "Chinese laundryman" as "kinless ...