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King

 [king]
Imogene M. Nursing educator, administrator, researcher, and practitioner. She developed a conceptual framework for nursing at a time when nursing was striving for status as a science and for recognition as a legitimate profession. From her conceptual system, a theory of goal attainment was derived, within which she developed a transaction process model that makes her theory a middle range theory. Her ideas have been tested in research and used by practitioners and educators. Several other theories have been derived from her conceptual system.

King

(king),
Earl J., Canadian biochemist, 1901-1962. See: King unit, King-Armstrong unit.

King, Imogene

(1923-2007), a nursing theorist who introduced her theory of goal attainment in her book, Toward a Theory for Nursing (1971). King defines nursing as a process of human interactions between nurse and patients who communicate to set goals and then agree to meet the goals. King's conceptual framework specifies three interacting systems: personal system, interpersonal system, and social system. She believes that the patient is a personal system within a social system, coexisting through interpersonal processes with other personal systems. The nurse and patient perceive each other and the situation, act and react, interact, and transact. From her major concepts (interaction, perception, communication, transaction, role, stress, growth and development, and time and space), she derives her theory of goal attainment. King describes nursing as a discipline and an applied science, with emphasis on the derivation of nursing knowledge from other disciplines. She suggests that the patient's and nurse's perceptions, judgments, and actions lead to reaction, interaction, and transaction, which she calls the process of nursing.
A regional term for cocaine
References in periodicals archive ?
Moin deftly lays out the emerging models and differential claims of Isma'il I and Babur and how those inceptionary images shaped each dynasty's subsequent elaborations, manipulations, and problems with sacred kingship (pp.
What David realized through his kingship in a limited, temporal way, Christ consummated in an eternal way, for Christ's resurrection was his coronation day, the day when he gave the promises of David an eternal fulfillment (Acts 13:26-34; cf.
The primary conclusions that Scarf draws from his meticulous study of the work of these three authors is as follows: they share a belief that a king is a "viceregent" of God, they believe that kings owe their allegiance to God, they believe that kings have an inherent glory, and they believe, in a paradoxical way, that the crucified Christ is a model for kingship.
Yet Yahweh gave his people a king at a certain point and thereafter there were fierce controversies over kingship, which inflected discussions at the time of Christ.
This reminds us that kingship has been the most common form of human government, and that the political common sense of the race for most of its history has been that "kings are sacred.
As the visible image of the invisible God, Jesus exercises his kingship by making peace through the blood of his cross.
17:15), but it does not extend the concept of the Kingdom of God beyond His Kingship over Israel.
In the period immediately after Louis's death in 1270, those who first sought to preserve his memory focused on three aspects of Louis's life: piety, crusades, and kingship.
s OT theology does not achieve thematic unity around a notion of YHWH's kingship, nor is unquestioned adherence to one narrow school of biblical interpretation sufficient to unify that theology.
The political transition between an older, thoughtful king who hesitates to act based on his wisdom and the younger, physically stronger warrior rising to kingship through brutal engagement in warfare is one of the underlying pulses in Beowulf.
Contributions discuss the Dutch reception of the King's poem, The Battle of Lepanto, the succession of 1603, James's ideas about kingship, his role in the Hampton Court conference, his attitude and involvement in the theatre, preaching at Paul's Cross and its relation to the King, his attitudes toward Protestant heresies, his relationship with the Authorised Version, the Perth Articles debate in Scotland and, finally, the editor writes on the King's reputation from his death to 2005.
Jodi Campbell describes this work as "a book about Spanish plays, the portrayal of kingship and how these fictional representations may be used to understand what real Spaniards thought about their own kings" (2).