kinetoplast

(redirected from kinetoplasts)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

kinetoplast

 [kĭ-ne´to-plast]
an accessory body found in many protozoa, primarily the Mastigophora; it contains DNA and replicates independently.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ki·ne·to·plast

(ki-nē'tō-plast, ki-net'ō-),
An intensely staining rod-shaped, diskoid, or spheric extranuclear DNA structure found in parasitic flagellates (family Trypanosomatidae) near the base of the flagellum, behind the blepharoplast, and often at right angles to the nucleus. Visible by light microscopy, electron micrographs reveal it as part of a single giant mitochondrion filling most of the cytoplasm of amastigote flagellates. Identifying kinetoplast as kDNA distinguishes it from nuclear DNA(nDNA). The kinetoplast divides independently, but with the basal body, before nuclear division. Kinetoplast formerly included parabasal body and blepharoplast in a locomotory apparatus but is now recognized as a distinct organelle of most trypanosomatids.
See also: parabasal body.
[kineto- + G. plastos, formed]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

kinetoplast

(kə-nĕt′ə-plăst′, -nē′tə-, kī-)
n.
A loop of DNA located in a large mitochondrion that lies near the base of the flagellum in certain protozoans.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ki·ne·to·plast

(ki-nē'tō-plast)
An intensely staining extranuclear DNA structure found in parasitic flagellates near the base of the flagellum. Electron micrographs show it to be part of a single giant mitochondrion filling most of the cytoplasm of amastigote flagellates.
See also: parabasal body
[kineto- + G. plastos, formed]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

kinetoplast

see KINETOSOME.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Three-Dimensional View of the Kinetoplast Revealed by Deep Etching
[20] revealed that the kDNA filaments were packaged in dense bundles within the kinetoplast of T.
Although the observation of thin sections and deep-etching replicas has yielded important contributions to studies of kinetoplast, the highly complex organization of the kDNA network can be better understood only after its isolation and observation, initially under TEM, and more recently using AFM.
Investigating the Topology of Kinetoplast DNA: Early Observation in EM Grids
Simpson and Da Silva [29] proposed that the diameter of the minicircle corresponds to the width of the kinetoplast observed in thin sections of resin-embedded cells.
Atomic Force Microscopy as a Tool to Investigate Kinetoplast DNA Organization: Advantages and Challenges
During its life cycle, this parasite undergoes major changes in the kinetoplast morphology and kDNA topology as it passes from the epimastigote replicative stage in the insect vector to the metacyclic trypomastigote form, which infects humans, in a process known as metacyclogenesis.
Abbreviations AFM: Atomic force microscopy EM: Electron microscopy kDNA: Kinetoplast DNA TAC: Tripartite attachment complex TEM: Transmission electron microscope.
Englund, "Kinetoplast DNA network: evolution of an improbable structure," Eukaryotic Cell, vol.
Englund, "The structure and replication of kinetoplast DNA," Annual Review of Microbiology, vol.
Englund, "Network news: the replication of kinetoplast DNA," Annual Review of Microbiology, vol.
Englund, "The rotational dynamics of kinetoplast DNA replication," Molecular Microbiology, vol.