kinetoplast

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kinetoplast

 [kĭ-ne´to-plast]
an accessory body found in many protozoa, primarily the Mastigophora; it contains DNA and replicates independently.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ki·ne·to·plast

(ki-nē'tō-plast, ki-net'ō-),
An intensely staining rod-shaped, diskoid, or spheric extranuclear DNA structure found in parasitic flagellates (family Trypanosomatidae) near the base of the flagellum, behind the blepharoplast, and often at right angles to the nucleus. Visible by light microscopy, electron micrographs reveal it as part of a single giant mitochondrion filling most of the cytoplasm of amastigote flagellates. Identifying kinetoplast as kDNA distinguishes it from nuclear DNA(nDNA). The kinetoplast divides independently, but with the basal body, before nuclear division. Kinetoplast formerly included parabasal body and blepharoplast in a locomotory apparatus but is now recognized as a distinct organelle of most trypanosomatids.
See also: parabasal body.
[kineto- + G. plastos, formed]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

kinetoplast

(kə-nĕt′ə-plăst′, -nē′tə-, kī-)
n.
A loop of DNA located in a large mitochondrion that lies near the base of the flagellum in certain protozoans.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ki·ne·to·plast

(ki-nē'tō-plast)
An intensely staining extranuclear DNA structure found in parasitic flagellates near the base of the flagellum. Electron micrographs show it to be part of a single giant mitochondrion filling most of the cytoplasm of amastigote flagellates.
See also: parabasal body
[kineto- + G. plastos, formed]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

kinetoplast

see KINETOSOME.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005