kinetochore


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to kinetochore: centrosome

kinetochore

 [ki-ne´to-kōr]
a centromere.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ki·ne·to·chore

(ki-nē'tō-kōr, ki-net'ō-),
The structural portion of the chromosome to which microtubules attach. Compare: centromere.
[kineto- + G. chōra, space]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

kinetochore

(kə-nĕt′ə-kôr′, -nē′tə-, kī-)
n.
Either of two submicroscopic attachment points for chromosomal microtubules, present on each centromere during the process of cell division.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ki·ne·to·chore

(ki-nē'tō-kōr)
The structural portion of the chromosome to which microtubules attach.
Compare: centromere
[kineto- + G. chōra, space]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

kinetochore

see CENTROMERE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Rieder, "The formation, structure, and composition of the mammalian kinetochore and kinetochore fiber," International Review of Cytology, vol.
Nigg, "Kinetochore localization and microtubule interaction of the human spindle checkpoint kinase Mps1," Chromosoma, vol.
Spatial regulation of kinetochore microtubule attachments by destabilization at spindle poles in meiosis 1.
During the prophase of meiosis I, the synapsed chromosomes form a bivalent structure that also has one exposed minus-face kinetochore and one exposed plus-face kinetochore.
More sophisticated and less destructive methods were slowly developed and in 1942, Carlson studied embryonic neuroblasts of Chortophaga (Carlson 1942), perforating living cells with a microneedle to manipulate the spindle and associated chromosomes; he determined that the latter were mechanically attached to the spindle, which was a semisolid longitudinal structure, through their kinetochores from prophase through late anaphase.
This control can be disrupted by interfering with DNA repair, kinetochore assembly, checkpoints, centrosome duplication, microtubule dynamics and numerous other cellular maintenance processes (42).
Holocentric chromosomes exhibit kinetochore along the major part of their length.
The kinetochore is the part of the centromere to which spindle fibers attach during cell division.
(1984) reported that the chromosomes of common buckwheat are similar to each other in size and all have a median kinetochore (m).
In prostate cancer (PCa), only few studies focused on the role of FoxM1; for instance, FoxM1 and its target CENPF, a structural protein of kinetochore, have been both proposed as critical drivers of PCa development and as prognostic markers of poor survival [85].