kinesthetic memory

kinesthetic memory

[kin′esthet′ik]
the recollection of movement, weight, resistance, and position of the body or parts of the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even when a musician performs with music scores, a certain degree of kinesthetic memory would still be necessary.
As well, Augustyniak's ( 2011) study concurred that not only the internal processes are necessary to help students improvise but also the combined internal and external processes of developing aural, visual and kinesthetic memory through explicit practice is necessary.
By not only listening to, but also playing musical compositions that associate emotional "tones" and kinesthetic memory to TOEFL vocabulary words, instrumental ELL students, like Mendez, can add proprioceptive as well as tactile feedback to their visual and auditory inputs to "try to pin down the exact quality" of meaning.
Thus Rainer showed her audience how she remade Balanchine's late-modernist ballet--by depending on video documentation instead of a dancer's kinesthetic memory.
The lack of supporting information is a particularly surprising omission for two tasks: kinesthetic memory and size estimation.
The highest weightings on the second factor, identified as "reaction" by the authors, occurred on the item recognition memory task, the kinesthetic memory task, and the size estimation task.
Recognizing Another Component Of Procedural Memory: Our Kinesthetic Memory
I'm never surprised when a dancer picks up a weapon and does well because they understand their bodies and have kinesthetic memory.
On the other hand, if kinesthetic memory really is an important modality for memorization, is there any way to teach or implement it so that it is more reliable?
That habit becomes his kinesthetic memory and, with the chronic muscle tension, comes the possibility for full-blown pain and injury later in life.
If the student, particularly at the elementary or intermediate level, waits to begin memorizing a piece until after he or she is playing it fluently, it is probably already mostly in the kinesthetic memory, and the student may not make the additional effort to visually and intellectually commit it to memory.
This strategy may be used to strengthen kinesthetic memory or as a beginning strategy for students who find it difficult to "hear" the piece without moving their fingers.