Hallucination

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hallucination

 [hah-loo″sĭ-na´shun]
a sensory impression (sight, touch, sound, smell, or taste) that has no basis in external stimulation. Hallucinations can have psychologic causes, as in mental illness, or they can result from drugs, alcohol, organic illnesses, such as brain tumor or senility, or exhaustion. When hallucinations have a psychologic origin, they usually represent a disguised form of a repressed conflict. adj. adj hallu´cinative, hallu´cinatory.
auditory hallucination a hallucination of hearing; the most common type.
gustatory hallucination a hallucination of taste.
haptic hallucination tactile hallucination.
hypnagogic hallucination a vivid, dreamlike hallucination occurring at sleep onset.
hypnopompic hallucination a vivid, dreamlike hallucination occurring on awakening.
kinesthetic hallucination a hallucination involving the sense of bodily movement.
olfactory hallucination a hallucination of smell.
somatic hallucination a hallucination involving the perception of a physical experience occurring within the body.
tactile hallucination a hallucination of touch.
visual hallucination a hallucination of sight.

hal·lu·ci·na·tion

(ha-lū-si-nā'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with delusion or illusion.
The apparent, often strong subjective perception of an external object or event when no such stimulus or situation is present; may be visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, or tactile.
[L. alucinor, to wander in mind]

hallucination

(hə-lo͞o′sə-nā′shən)
n.
1.
a. Perception of visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, or gustatory stimuli in the absence of any external objects or events and with a compelling sense of their reality, resulting from certain mental and physical disorders or as a response to a drug.
b. The objects or events so perceived.
2. A false or mistaken idea.

hal·lu′ci·na′tion·al, hal·lu′ci·na′tive adj.
A complex sensory perception that occurs without external stimulation, which is characterised by false or distorted perception of objects or events—e.g., sights, sounds, tastes, smells, or sensations of touch—often accompanied by a powerful sense of reality

hallucination

Neurology A complex sensory perception that occurs without external stimulation, characterized by false or distorted perception of objects or events–eg, sights, sounds, tastes, smells, or sensations of touch, often accompanied by a powerful sense of reality. See Command, Functional, Hypnogenic, Hypnopompic, Olfactory hallucination. Cf Illusion, Schizophrenia.

hal·lu·ci·na·tion

(hă-lū'si-nā'shŭn)
The subjective perception of an object or event when no such stimulus or situation is present; may be visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, or tactile.
[L. alucinor, to wander in mind]

hallucination

A sense perception in the absence of an external cause. Hallucinations may involve sights (visual hallucinations), sounds (auditory), smells (olfactory), tastes (gustatory), touch (tactile) or size (dimensional). Hallucinations should be distinguished from delusions-which are mistaken ideas.

Hallucination

A sensory experience of something that does not exist outside the mind. A person can experience a hallucination in any of the five senses. Auditory hallucinations are a common symptom of schizophrenia.

hal·lu·ci·na·tion

(hă-lū'si-nā'shŭn) Do not confuse this word with delusion or illusion.
Apparent, often strong subjective perception of an external object or event when no such stimulus or situation is present.
[L. alucinor, to wander in mind]

Patient discussion about Hallucination

Q. Give life to her please! Here is a really confusing question to you all. But your reply is a life for her. I know someone who is bipolar and she thinks that her ‘brother’ sexually molested her when they were kids. Can this be a delusion? Or hallucinating?

A. Im going to answer this question a little different;What if she is telling the truth,and her brother is planning on no body believing her? because she has this disease?---keep that in mind when you take her to the DR--mrfoot56

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