kinesiology

(redirected from kinesiologists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to kinesiologists: kinesiology, kinesiological

kinesiology

 [kĭ-ne″se-ol´o-je]
the scientific study of movement of the human body or its parts. See also biomechanics.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ki·ne·si·ol·o·gy

(ki-nē'sē-ol'ŏ-jē),
The science or the study of movement, and the active and passive structures involved.
[G. kinēsis, movement, + -logos, study]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

kinesiology

(kə-nē′sē-ŏl′ə-jē, -zē-)
n.
1. The study of the anatomy, physiology, and mechanics of body movement, especially in humans.
2. The application of the principles of kinesiology to the evaluation and treatment of muscular imbalance or derangement.

ki·ne′si·ol′o·gist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

kinesiology

An alternative healthcare system based on the posit that disease is caused by the accumulation of toxins around major muscle groups, which translates into muscle weakness. Kinesiology is delivered by the fingertips at appropriate pressure points; anecdotal data suggest that kinesiology may be effective in treating allergies, back and/or neck pain, common cold, depression, fatigue, headache, indigestion, mineral and vitamin deficiencies, muscular weakness, sciatica, tension and other conditions.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

kinesiology

Biomechanics The science of body movements especially vis-á-vis therapy
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ki·ne·si·ol·o·gy

(ki-nē'sē-ol'ŏ-jē)
The science or the study of movement, and the active and passive structures involved.
[G. kinēsis, movement, + -logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

kinesiology

The study of muscles and their effects on movements, especially in relation to physical therapy.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Kinesiology

The science or study of movement.
Mentioned in: Bursitis
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ki·ne·si·ol·o·gy

(ki-nē'sē-ol'ŏ-jē)
Science or the study of movement, and active and passive structures involved.
[G. kinēsis, movement, + -logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The KINAP was designed in 2004 to be administered during the rehabilitation process by a kinesiologist, who could use it to target physical and sports activities likely to trigger fears in individuals suffering from musculoskeletal pain.
"Kilo-Actif's success is largely based on the adoption of an interval training program," added Valerie Guilbault, an EPIC Centre kinesiologist who oversaw the training of the participants.
While some physical therapists (PTs), kinesiologists, and biomechanists use the anterior superior iliac spines (ASIS) and the pubic symphysis to assess pelvic alignment, (5,7) it has been more common for dance researchers to use the relationship between the ASIS and the posterior superior iliac spines (PSIS) to make that assessment in dancers (8-12) and nondancers.
Kinesiologists work in research, the fitness industry, clinically, and in industrial environments.
Intended audience: Patients, physiatrists (musculoskeletal medicine practitioners), rheumatologists, physical therapists, occupational therapists, family physicians, kinesiologists, and other health care professionals.
Active Release has been taught to many disciplines, such as Chiropractors, Physiotherapists, Massage Therapists, Kinesiologists, and Sports Physicians.
Although the relatively low levels of disability and pain are a likely cause for decreased differences between groups, it can be argued that clients with similar pain and disability characteristics are likely candidates for conservative care treatment and likely to present to kinesiologists or trainers for fitness appraisals.
That's why Wagner chose the small town downstream from Telluride, rather than staying in Boulder where he received his MBA, and assembled his advisory board of Front Range businessmen, biomechanics experts, kinesiologists, ski designers, physical therapists, racing coaches and angel investors.
Kinesiologists have discovered many methods for obtaining clear "yes" or "no" answers (see a list of online descriptions in the resources, below).
Kinesiologists believe that by "testing" the muscles of patients - in health kinesiology the forearm is used - they can pinpoint areas of imbalance in the body.