kinesiology

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kinesiology

 [kĭ-ne″se-ol´o-je]
the scientific study of movement of the human body or its parts. See also biomechanics.

ki·ne·si·ol·o·gy

(ki-nē'sē-ol'ŏ-jē),
The science or the study of movement, and the active and passive structures involved.
[G. kinēsis, movement, + -logos, study]

kinesiology

/ki·ne·si·ol·o·gy/ (ki-ne″se-ol´ah-je)
1. the sum of what is known regarding human motion; the study of motion of the human body.
2. a system of diagnosis based on the theory that muscle dysfunction is secondary to subclinical structural, chemical, or mental dysfunction in other parts of the body; using manual muscle testing to help identify the primary dysfunction and treating by attempting to correct the underlying state.

kinesiology

(kə-nē′sē-ŏl′ə-jē, -zē-)
n.
1. The study of the anatomy, physiology, and mechanics of body movement, especially in humans.
2. The application of the principles of kinesiology to the evaluation and treatment of muscular imbalance or derangement.

ki·ne′si·ol′o·gist n.

kinesiology

[-ol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, kinesis + logos, science
the scientific study of muscular activity and the anatomy, physiology, and mechanics of the movement of body parts.

kinesiology

An alternative healthcare system based on the posit that disease is caused by the accumulation of toxins around major muscle groups, which translates into muscle weakness. Kinesiology is delivered by the fingertips at appropriate pressure points; anecdotal data suggest that kinesiology may be effective in treating allergies, back and/or neck pain, common cold, depression, fatigue, headache, indigestion, mineral and vitamin deficiencies, muscular weakness, sciatica, tension and other conditions.

kinesiology

Biomechanics The science of body movements especially vis-á-vis therapy

ki·ne·si·ol·o·gy

(ki-nē'sē-ol'ŏ-jē)
The science or the study of movement, and the active and passive structures involved.
[G. kinēsis, movement, + -logos, study]

kinesiology

The study of muscles and their effects on movements, especially in relation to physical therapy.

Kinesiology

The science or study of movement.
Mentioned in: Bursitis

kinesiology (k·nēˈ·zē·äˑ·l·jē),

n study of the body's structure and processes as they relate to movement.

ki·ne·si·ol·o·gy

(ki-nē'sē-ol'ŏ-jē)
Science or the study of movement, and active and passive structures involved.
[G. kinēsis, movement, + -logos, study]

kinesiology (kinē´sēol´əjē),

n the study of motion that attempts to explain the manner in which movements of the body occur. The principles of kinesiology may be used to describe the laws of articulation and the several theories of mandibular movement.

kinesiology

scientific study of movement of body parts.
References in periodicals archive ?
The research kinesiological revealed that the number of patients who showed no shots of electromyographic activity during the period of pre-swallowing had a positive correlation with the severity of reflux and the quantity of liquid swallowed.
The ABC of EMG, a practical introduction to kinesiological electromyography.
Greater Washington Dance Center, owned by Gretchen Vogelzang, who has been teaching dance in the Northern Virginia area for 12 years, applies the finest methods of teaching supported by solid kinesiological understanding to assist young dancers and adults achieve their greatest potential.
As a kinesiological operator, dance is efficient from the aspect of transformational, educational and nurturing effects (G.
Rochlitz's own breakthroughs for attacks of porphyria/MCS include hypocapnia, hiatal hernia and vagus nerve balancing, trigger points, kinesiological and acupressure, brain temperature balancing, and the PFO connection.
Biomechanical and kinesiological study of postures trough digital photographs: cases report.
A kinesiological approach applies scientific based medical principles towards the analysis, preservation and enhancement of human movement in all settings and populations.
In combination with the ergonomic conditions and kinesiological consequences, these components lead to the withincycle torque-generation pattern presented in Figure 5, which can be divided into four quadrants: ACC and DEC, split by TO1 and TO2.
Kinesiological Development: Interpretation of a Process to Enhance Body Movement
Along with its very clear line drawings and cross sections and additions to the bibliography, this edition includes a substantial amount of kinesiological information in the comments section for each muscle.
In Kinesiotherapy, kinesiological principles are applied to the kinetic chain of the neuromusculoskeletal system to restore function, taking into consideration other support functions that may involve the metabolic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, endocrine, and other organ systems.
Kinesiological foundations of coaching [2 hours] 5.