kinesiology

(redirected from kinesiological)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

kinesiology

 [kĭ-ne″se-ol´o-je]
the scientific study of movement of the human body or its parts. See also biomechanics.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ki·ne·si·ol·o·gy

(ki-nē'sē-ol'ŏ-jē),
The science or the study of movement, and the active and passive structures involved.
[G. kinēsis, movement, + -logos, study]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

kinesiology

(kə-nē′sē-ŏl′ə-jē, -zē-)
n.
1. The study of the anatomy, physiology, and mechanics of body movement, especially in humans.
2. The application of the principles of kinesiology to the evaluation and treatment of muscular imbalance or derangement.

ki·ne′si·ol′o·gist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

kinesiology

An alternative healthcare system based on the posit that disease is caused by the accumulation of toxins around major muscle groups, which translates into muscle weakness. Kinesiology is delivered by the fingertips at appropriate pressure points; anecdotal data suggest that kinesiology may be effective in treating allergies, back and/or neck pain, common cold, depression, fatigue, headache, indigestion, mineral and vitamin deficiencies, muscular weakness, sciatica, tension and other conditions.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

kinesiology

Biomechanics The science of body movements especially vis-á-vis therapy
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ki·ne·si·ol·o·gy

(ki-nē'sē-ol'ŏ-jē)
The science or the study of movement, and the active and passive structures involved.
[G. kinēsis, movement, + -logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

kinesiology

The study of muscles and their effects on movements, especially in relation to physical therapy.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Kinesiology

The science or study of movement.
Mentioned in: Bursitis
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ki·ne·si·ol·o·gy

(ki-nē'sē-ol'ŏ-jē)
Science or the study of movement, and active and passive structures involved.
[G. kinēsis, movement, + -logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Kinesiological analysis of this boy revealed that he was a "good listener." His responses were seldom meta-incongruent, he steered the conversation with face and head kinemorphs, and he seldom engaged in leg and foot "jiggling" which generally conveys a contextual meaning of restlessness, malaise, or negation.
Electromyography is used to assess the scope of diseases or traumas as well as a tool for studying kinesiological neuromuscular function.
Kinesiological aspects of functional limitations during movement and posture.
His technique is a blend of anatomical awareness, kinesiological principles, body therapies, and movement repatterning that borrows heavily from Irmgard Bartenieff's Fundamentals and Rudolf Laban's theories of Effort, Shape, and Space Harmony.
EnergySmart give kinesiological initial and sustained energy claims to products, at economical usage levels.
in exercise science from the University of Southern Mississippi and has since been employed at Old Dominion University, where he is assistant professor of exercise science and sports medicine and director of the Laboratory of Kinesiological and Biomechanical Studies.
Kinesiological evidence shows that the diving motion is significantly influenced by the initial visual determination of depth and remains relatively unchanged throughout the course of motion.
The system consists of four modules: (1) a robotic rehabilitation device (PERCRO-BRANDO); (2) VR serious games for motion task execution of the forearm; (3) the therapist graphic interface; and (4) and a task difficulty adaptation module based on the monitored patient kinesiological performance through time.
In several studies on the effects of the kinesiotaping on different musculoskeletal disorders, kinesiological taping has been found to strengthen the muscles around the joints, increase the joint stability, ease the joint mobility, decrease the tension in the muscles, ligaments and tendons, and increase the proprioception.
To clarify the changes of muscle strength due to diabetes, the present study aims to assess the kinesiological EMG concurrently with torque of knee flexors and extensors during isometric maximal voluntary contraction in patients with less or more than 10 years of T2DM compared to healthy subjects that were matched with patients in terms of sex, body mass index (BMI), physical activity index (PAI) and ankle brachial index (ABI).