kinesics


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kinesics

 [kĭ-ne´siks]
the scientific study of the role of body movements, such as facial expressions, gestures, and eye movements, in interpersonal communication.

ki·ne·sics

(ki-nē'siks),
The study of nonverbal bodily motion in communication. See: body language.

kinesics

/ki·ne·sics/ (ki-ne´siks) the study of body movement as a part of the process of communication.

kinesics

[kīnē′siks]
Etymology: Gk, kinesis, motion
the study of body position, posture, movement, and facial expression in relation to communication. The observance of nonverbal interactional behavior is an integral part of health assessment and is used especially in mental health assessment as an objective and measurable tool for diagnosing disturbances of communication and behavioral disorders. See also body language, communication.

ki·ne·sics

(ki-nē'siks)
The study of nonverbal bodily motion in communication.

ki·ne·sics

(ki-nē'siks)
The study of nonverbal bodily motion in communication.
References in periodicals archive ?
This article will specifically explore the perceived importance of the following nonverbal factors in the negotiation process: proxemics (location and negotiation site), physical arrangement (seating and furniture arrangement), and kinesics (eye contact, facial expressions and gestures).
As these works show, it is time that the long-neglected domain of kinesics was included in our discourse on teaching and learning languages.
Although the kinesics and Reid methods are widely recognized as effective, no single approach to interrogation holds the entire solution.
Although this list of behavioral manifestations provided language teachers with a point of departure for detecting foreign-language anxiety, preliminary inroads were made with a compilation of nonverbal kinesic behaviors indicative of foreign-language anxiety, which gave teachers actual physical manifestations to look for including more stoical facial expressions and limited eye contact; rigid, closed posture; and use of more self-adaptive gesture than illustrative, speech-related hand movements (Gregersen, 2005).
Contributors include Anne Cranny-Francis ("Moving The Matrix: Kinesic Excess and Postindustrial Being"), Pamela Church Gibson ("Fashion, Fetish and Spectacle: The Matrix Dresses Up--and Down"), Catherine Constable ("Baudrillardian Revolutions: Repetition and Radical Intervention in the Matrix Trilogy"), and Paul Sheehan ("Immanence, Autonomy and Integral Anomalies").
The most traditionally studied code of nonverbal communication is kinesics, or the visual aspects of behavior.
Thus, Elam has emphasized the importance of kinesics or body-motion communication (69-78); proxemics or the use of space in performance (62-67); and paralinguistics or the vocal qualities, pitch, tempo, loudness of the actors' speech delivery (78-83) as meaning-constitutive systems in the theatrical text.
See also Ray Birdwhistell, Kinesics and Context: Essays on Body Motion Communication (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1970), pp.
Social workers must be even more sensitive to kinesics, facial expression, eye contact, silences, rate of speech, and other behavior that could be determined by the client's culture, speech avoidance behaviors, or secondary characteristics of stuttering.
The role of context in culture and nonverbal communication is also addressed in Ray Birdwhistell's Kinesics and Context (1970), and media ecology itself has been characterized as eschewing the popular research method of content analysis in favor of context analysis.
To establish rapport with this witness, Detective Hamilton knows that he needs to match her nonverbal behavior, or kinesics, by sitting down and leaning forward.