kinesics

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Related to kinesic: proxemics

kinesics

 [kĭ-ne´siks]
the scientific study of the role of body movements, such as facial expressions, gestures, and eye movements, in interpersonal communication.

ki·ne·sics

(ki-nē'siks),
The study of nonverbal bodily motion in communication. See: body language.

kinesics

/ki·ne·sics/ (ki-ne´siks) the study of body movement as a part of the process of communication.

kinesics

[kīnē′siks]
Etymology: Gk, kinesis, motion
the study of body position, posture, movement, and facial expression in relation to communication. The observance of nonverbal interactional behavior is an integral part of health assessment and is used especially in mental health assessment as an objective and measurable tool for diagnosing disturbances of communication and behavioral disorders. See also body language, communication.

ki·ne·sics

(ki-nē'siks)
The study of nonverbal bodily motion in communication.

ki·ne·sics

(ki-nē'siks)
The study of nonverbal bodily motion in communication.
References in periodicals archive ?
The meaning of dance figures may be influenced by the emotional structure and content of the accompanying music (Laban 50), while the prevailing function of the musical message may be transferred to the kinesic discourse.
In the same vein, Guillemette Bolens applies her concept of kinesic intelligence in a detailed reading of Charlie Chaplin's corporeal comedy.
Most obviously in this regard, he consistently deploys small-scale kinesic and paralinguistic cues that are well captured in the synch sound, medium close and close up shots that Lunson uses to render his interviews, each of which help to generate a sense that he is amenable to self-effacement.
The examination of the use of kinesics in eliciting expressive ensemble response and its application in an undergraduate choral conducting curriculum.
Visual cues--including kinesics (body movement, gesture, and posture); facial expression and gaze behavior; and nonverbal auditory cues such as pitch, volume, and rate--function in concert intentionally or inadvertently to communicate emotion.
Foster, Springer, and Nakamura all engage in race studies, but they are divided into two sections and then Springer and Nakamura are separated by essays on kinesics and fashion; in addition, O'Riordan would also be more effective in closer proximity to both Foster's essay and Gillis's femme fatale discussions.
To our own writing now and the contributions in this issue which, as usual, exemplify the wide spread of interests and concerns of language teachers, from the realisation of macrotheories in instances of micropractice--Mackerras using Vygotskian theory to teach Japanese text and my own article on language teaching grounded in kinesic theory--to Curnow and Kohler on learner attitudes to language as a school subject, Ren discussing examiner bias, and Hayes on the matter of professional rewards.
A study by Albert Mehrabian in 1972 indicated that one person's liking for another is conveyed 55 percent by kinesic expression (facial expression and body movement), 38 percent by tone of voice and only 7 percent by words.
Many non-verbal vocalizations and kinesic actions (e.
That is, it assumes that homosexuality can be visibly signified by clothing, gait, posture, facial expression, hand gesture, or other kinesic symbols.
Walters, Principles of Kinesic Interview and Interrogation (Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 1996), preface.