kinematograph


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kinematograph

(kĭn″ĕ-māt′o-grăf)
A device for viewing photographs of objects in motion; used in studying the motion of organs such as the heart and lungs, and the gastrointestinal tract.
References in periodicals archive ?
"A Method of and Means for Running a Phonograph or Gramophone and a Kinematograph in Synchronism." British Patent 22,566, filed 19 October 1903, issued 19 November 1903.
"Reminiscences of the British Film Trade." 26-page pamphlet, Proceedings of the British Kinematograph Society 21 (1933): 1-26.
The Kinematograph lends the observed objects the agitation of their movement, the stillness of the gaze seems more important.
(28) A synopsis of the film's plot may be found in the Supplement to The Kinematograph and Lantern Weekly for 27 February 1913 on p.
Mr Morris notes that when Sheckman died in 1963, at a time when he was a such a prominent figure in the world of cinemas, the trade magazine Kinematograph carried an obituary merely 10 lines long.
He was a Fellow of the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers; a Fellow of the British Kinematograph Sound and Television Society; a longtime member, and five-time chairman, of AMPAS' Scientific and Technical Awards Committee; and an associate member of the American Society of Cinematographers.
A member of the British Society of Cinematographers (BSC) and a Fellow of the British Kinematograph, Sound and Television Society (FBKS), he has won two Independent Producers' Association (INDIE) awards and has had two BAFTA award nominations.
At Cape Evans, he constructed a tiny darkroom within the small base hut, where he developed every plate and film he had exposed in the South Pole as well as thousands of metres of kinematograph film.
Value guide: 1933 King Kong original poster, pounds 25,000; Picturegoer magazine 1934 Jean Harlow issue, pounds 10; Williamson Kinematograph hand-cranked cinema camera, c1910, pounds 2,500.
statistician and President of the British Kinematograph
The British Kinematograph Weekly, writing about the imminent opening of David Copperfield in London, claimed that 'Nordisk has proved its ability to translate the works of Charles Dickens to the language of the screen in fine productions of Our Mutual Friend and Great Expectations' and forecast a similar or greater success for the latest film.