kinase


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kinase

 [ki´nās]
1. a subclass of the transferases, comprising the enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a high-energy group from a donor (usually ATP) to an acceptor, and named, according to the acceptor, as creatine kinase, fructokinase, etc.
2. an enzyme that activates a zymogen, named, according to its source, such as enterokinase, streptokinase, etc.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ki·nase

(kī'nās),
1. Enzyme that catalyzes conversion of a proenzyme to an active one (for example, enteropeptidase [enterokinase]). Important in salvage and recycling of nucleotides. Some antiviral agents work by inactivating viral or tumor kinases
2. Suffix attached to some enzymes to indicate transformation.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

kinase

(kī′nās′, -nāz′, kĭn′ās′, -āz′)
n.
Any of various enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a phosphate group from a donor, such as ADP or ATP, to an acceptor protein. Kinases regulate many essential cellular processes.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ki·nase

(kī'nās)
1. An enzyme catalyzing the conversion of a proenzyme to an active enzyme.
2. An enzyme catalyzing the transfer of phosphate groups to form triphosphates (e.g., adenosine triphosphate).
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

kinase

See TRANSFERASE.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

kinase

an enzyme that catalyses the transfer of a phosphoryl group from ATP to another compound.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGFR) Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors
ETI is mediated by R genes, such as NBS-LRR, receptor-like kinases (RLK) and serine/ threonine kinase.
The authors concluded that hypothermia alone attenuated the over-activation of CaM kinase IV and improved neuropathology after hypoxia.
To validate the docking protocol, the ligands from the complexed structures of PIM-1 and PIM-2 were extracted and redocked in the crystal structure of PIM-1 kinase (PDB code 3JYA) and PIM-2 kinase (PDB code 2IWI) bound with the inhibitor molecule.
Here, we take kinase GSK3B, PLK1, P38A (MAPK14), and CDK2 as an example to illustrate the predictive performance, as shown in Figure 2.
Upon activation of the cascade, phosphorylation of the more downstream effector kinases (ERK1/2) induces cell cycle progression by transcriptional upregulation of cyclin D1, degradation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p27, and activation of p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (p90RSK), which in turn inactivates the cell cycle-inhibitory protein myelin transcription factor 1 (MYT1) (Figure 2).
Kinase Inhibitors for Cancer Treatment Market: Drivers and Restraints
The ERK pathway is activated mainly by growth factors (epidermal growth factor, EGF, and platelet-derived growth factor, PDGF) and cytokines (IL-1[beta] and TNF-[alpha]), and its activation is related to the stimulation of tyrosine kinase receptors [52, 53].
EGFR is a single transmembrane protein that possesses intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity, which can be directly activated or transactivated in response to a variety of stimuli (Gschwind et al.
The Aurora-A is encoded by the AURKA gene (also known as AIK, Aurora/IPL1-like kinase; ARK1, Aurora related kinase 1; AURA, AURORA2; BTAK, breast tumoramplified kinase; PPP1R47, protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 47; STK15, serine/threonine-protein kinase 15; STK6, serine/threonine kinase 6), located at 20q13.2 and consisting of 11 exons (Gene ID: 6790).