kinaesthetic


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

kin·es·thet·ic

(kin'es-thet'ik)
Relating to kinesthesia.
Synonym(s): kinaesthetic.

kinaesthetic

capable of detecting movements, as in the sense organs of muscles, tendons and joints.

kin·es·thet·ic

(kin'es-thet'ik)
1. Relating to kinesthesia.
2. A person who preferentially uses mental imagery of sensate experience.
Synonym(s): kinaesthetic.
References in periodicals archive ?
spatial and dynamic kinaesthetic differentiation (time and mistakes)--a subject was asked to touch 100 randomly displayed squares with a tablet pen as fast as possible; the result was expressed in seconds and numbers of mistakes.
With respect to spatial and dynamic kinaesthetic differentiation, spatial orientation, visual-motor coordination and speed, accuracy and precision of movements, the computation was also performed using the indices which represented the total of the normalized results obtained for an athlete tested with respect to the number of mistakes made and the time of performing the test.
54), temporal parameters of kinaesthetic differentiation (z = -0.
As presented in Table 2, for the dyslexic group significant correlations were found between kinaesthetic learning and a) primary school performance (r=-.
It appears that dyslexic students prefer kinaesthetic learning which means that they learn best through doing and touching, through a hands-on approach, as a result of their need for activity and exploration.
This suggestion seems reasonable according to the identified kinaesthetic learning preference of the dyslexic students in this sample.
Students prefer mostly the visual and auditory mode of perception than the kinaesthetic mode.
Now try to imagine your body moving via a kinaesthetic image (without any visual experience of yourself), so that you feel as if you are moving without any actual movement occurring.
For Merleau-Ponty, recognizing oneself in a mirror is possible only if one has a kinaesthetic body.
Although kinaesthetic imagery is commonly considered to be of importance in the formation of internal perspective images (Murphy & Jowdy, 1992), it may also be possible to experience kinaesthetic imagery with external visual imagery or without any visual imagery whatsoever.
Commonly, internal kinaesthetic imagery has been associated with sport skills that require a complex set of movements to be performed in a relatively static environment, such as diving and gymnastics (Mahoney & Avener, 1977; Taylor, 1993).