kinaesthetic


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

kin·es·thet·ic

(kin'es-thet'ik)
Relating to kinesthesia.
Synonym(s): kinaesthetic.

kinaesthetic

capable of detecting movements, as in the sense organs of muscles, tendons and joints.

kin·es·thet·ic

(kin'es-thet'ik)
1. Relating to kinesthesia.
2. A person who preferentially uses mental imagery of sensate experience.
Synonym(s): kinaesthetic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Internal consistencies (Cronbach alpha) for each of the Betts' QMI scales were: visual = .80, auditory = .76, cutaneous = .71, kinaesthetic = .82, gustatory = .74, olfactory = 76, and organic = .83.
p = .27, power = .20, [[??].sup.2.sub.p] = .006; Auditory imagery, F(1, 243) = 2.71, MSE = 1.02, p = .10, power = .38, [[??].sup.2.sub.p] = .01; Cutaneous imagery, F (1, 243) = 3.04, MSE = .91, p = .08, power = .41, [[??].sup.2.sub.p] = .01; Kinaesthetic imagery, F(1, 243) = 02, MSE = .98, p = .89, power = .05, [[??].sup.2.sub.p] = .001; Gustatory imagery, F(1, 243) = .55, MSE = .94, p = .46, power = .12, [[??].sup.2.sub.p] = .003; Olfactory imagery, F(1, 243) = .12, MSE = 1.13, p = .73, power = .06, [[??].sup.2.sub.p] = .001, and Organic imagery, F(1, 243) = .54, MSE = 1.10, p = .46, power = .11, [[??].sup.2.sub.p] = .003.
* spatial and dynamic kinaesthetic differentiation (time and mistakes)--a subject was asked to touch 100 randomly displayed squares with a tablet pen as fast as possible; the result was expressed in seconds and numbers of mistakes.
With respect to spatial and dynamic kinaesthetic differentiation, spatial orientation, visual-motor coordination and speed, accuracy and precision of movements, the computation was also performed using the indices which represented the total of the normalized results obtained for an athlete tested with respect to the number of mistakes made and the time of performing the test.
Your children may not fit one of the categories described, visual, auditory or kinaesthetic, but might be a combination of two styles.
I think kinaesthetic learners used to be called fidgets.
We also find 48% of learners preferring to process visual information, 36% auditory and 16% preferring kinaesthetic and tactile instruction.
Sheets-Johnstone reminds philosophers who regard all of consciousness as entirely linguistic, and scientists who view language as a brain process, that language is always a kinaesthetic phenomenon: One must move to talk, whether by vocal or manual means.
Although kinaesthetic imagery is commonly considered to be of importance in the formation of internal perspective images (Murphy & Jowdy, 1992), it may also be possible to experience kinaesthetic imagery with external visual imagery or without any visual imagery whatsoever.