kinesthesia

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kinesthesia

 [kin″es-the´zhah]
the sense by which position, weight, and movement are perceived. adj., adj kinesthet´ic.

kin·es·the·si·a

(kin'es-thē'zē-ă),
1. The sense perception of movement; the muscular sense.
2. An illusion of moving in space.
Synonym(s): kinesthesis
[G. kinēsis, motion, + aisthēsis, sensation]

kinesthesia

(kĭn′ĭs-thē′zhə, kī′nĭs-)
n.
The sense that detects bodily position, weight, or movement of the muscles, tendons, and joints.

kin′es·thet′ic (-thĕt′ĭk) adj.
kin′es·thet′i·cal·ly adv.

proprioception

(1) The internal sense of the relative position of the body’s musculoskeletal units with each other and the effort needed to move them.
(2) Kinaesthetic sense, see there.

kin·es·the·si·a

(kin'es-thē'zē-ă)
1. The sense perception of movement; the muscular sense.
2. An illusion of moving in space.
Synonym(s): kinaesthesia.
[G. kinēsis, motion, + aisthēsis, sensation]

kin·es·the·si·a

, kinesthesis (kin'es-thē'zē-ă, -sis)
1. Sense perception of movement; muscular sense.
2. Illusion of moving in space.
Synonym(s): kinaesthesia, kinaesthesis.
[G. kinēsis, motion, + aisthēsis, sensation]
References in periodicals archive ?
If indeed young infants can imitate or match forms across sensory modalities, this is not a generalized capacity: Infants may be able to match from vision to kinaesthesis when they exhibit imitation at birth, but evidence that they can match from kinaesthesis to vision is not present until about 14 months of age, when infants recognize that they are being imitated and (soon after) recognize themselves in mirrors.
In Sheets-Johnstone's view, it is odd that Merleau-Ponty, so often perceived to be the philosopher of the body, almost completely ignores kinaesthesis and seems to assume that it is part of an unexplicatable background for experience (e.g.
Merleau-Ponty recognizes exactly the match between self-motion and others' movements in his positing of a structure, the 'corporeal schema' (used in imitation, self-recognition and intersubjective awareness), by which older infants match between kinaesthesis and vision.
However, it is unclear how much attention infants and developing children, let alone adults, pay to the fact that other speakers must make the same muscular movements that they themselves make to produce the same sounds; people often examine other people's movements without thinking at all about kinaesthesis. For ex ample, people are usually able to select the dance, from among three sequentially presented dances on videotape, that best matches (and was intended to express) a particular piece of music, but they typically do so without being aware of any kinaesthetic response to the music or dances or of any kinaesthetic experience on the part of the dancer (Mitchell & Gallaher, 2001).