Diamond

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Dia·mond

(dī'mŏnd),
L. S., U.S. researcher, b. 1920. See: Diamond TYM medium.

Dia·mond

(dī'mŏnd),
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Diabetes Mondiale. An international epidemiologic study of type 1 diabetes in children conducted from 1990–1999, which assessed 31,000 children in 53 countries
Conclusion The range of global variation in the incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes is larger than previously described and appears to follow ethnic and racial distribution
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The company pioneering the work, Subterrane, believe they have identified five targets likely to be kimberlites. We are working to better define where to drill.
Although magnetic signatures of known kimberlites are not indicative of diamond content, the potential of the Stein cluster of high interest targets is further reinforced by heavy mineral samples collected down ice which contain indicator mineral grains that are indicative of diamond inclusion chemistry showing high chrome, low calcium G10D pyrope garnets.
The nearest known kimberlite discovery to Stein is over 230 kilometers to the southeast and perpendicular to the regional ice flow direction.
Kimberlite Candy should appreciate a step up in trip this afternoon TALK OF THE TOON
"It would be very surprising if there weren't diamonds in these kimberlites," lead researcher Greg Yaxley, of the Australian National University in Canberra, (http://in.reuters.com/article/2013/12/17/antarctica-diamonds-idINL6N0JW3Q020131217) told Reuters.
"These rocks represent the first reported occurrence of genuine kimberlite in Antarctica," they wrote of the finds around Mount Meredith in the Prince Charles Mountains.
Rough Kimberlite diamonds are sorted into 5,000 different categories of shape, colour and clarity and in many more than one polished gem will be cut from a single piece.
The diamonds mined today were formed deep in the earth billions of years ago and were delivered to the surface by a volcanic rock known as "kimberlite".
"Twenty relatively small (50kg) samples from five kimberlite localities returned at total of 67 diamonds," Crew Minerals said.
For instance, occurrences of kimberlite indicator minerals were discovered during the course of a joint GSC-MRNF survey of esker sediments (Parent et al.
After rising, the magma cools and hardens into diamond-dotted kimberlite.