kiloton

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kiloton

1. 1000 tons.
2. A unit of ‘yield’ for atomic bombs, equivalent to the explosive force of 1000 tons of TNT.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
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The report reveals that the amount of electronic waste (e-waste) generated globally reached an estimated 46,000 kilotonnes -- equivalent to 46 million tonnes -- in 2017 alone.
The company added that the investment will be a continuous annealing solution heat (CASH) treatment line that will add approximately 100 kilotonnes of capacity and will include a high-speed slitter as well as a fully automated packaging line.
The industry is anticipated to achieve 2,768 kilotonnes in terms of production by end of 2023.
The latest - on September 3, 2017, when the power of the exploded charge, according to the opinion of a number of analysts, may have reached 100 kilotonnes.
50 to 120 kilotonnes. A 50kt device would be about three times the size
"Dubai Lamp serves this strategy by reducing energy consumption by 90 per cent and will reduce an amount of 640 kilotonnes of carbon dioxide emissions until 2021," said Al Badwawi.
The suspension of operations at Stobie will result in a reduction of approximately 4-6 kilotonnes of nickel and 5-8 kilotonnes of copper production annually.
The Netherlands injected 60 kilotonnes of C[O.sub.2] into a depleted gas reservoir in the K12B project during 2004 and 2009 [7].
Even environmentalists who were once labelled treehuggers now rattle on about fuel efficiency ratings and ecological footprints, contaminants in parts per billion, food trade journeys in thousands of kilometres and greenhouse gases in kilotonnes of carbon equivalent.
The weapon had a yield of about 15 kilotonnes and killed 140,000 people.
Such a yield would make this test larger than the nuclear bomb dropped by the United States on the Japanese city of Hiroshima in World War Two, which exploded with an energy of about 15 kilotonnes.
France also condemned the nuclear test, which is believed to be the biggest-ever -- measuring 10 kilotonnes.