kiloton


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kiloton

1. 1000 tons.
2. A unit of ‘yield’ for atomic bombs, equivalent to the explosive force of 1000 tons of TNT.
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References in periodicals archive ?
One such weapon, the Davy Crockett, contained warheads weighing only fifty-one pounds, with explosive yields near 0.01 kilotons (roughly 10 tons of TNT).
The first three tests involved a fission device which yielded 12 Kilotons a thermonuclear device of 43 Kilotons (although denied by Dr.
Working off that data, South Korean officials estimate the yield of the device - a measure of how strong its explosion is in comparison to TNT - to be between 6 and 7 kilotons. The United States has estimated it at "several kilotons." Either way, it would be North Korea's biggest yield yet but far less than that of the weapon dropped on Hiroshima in 1945, which was about 20 kilotons.
One report placed the yield at as little as 0.2 kilotons. (65) According to other reports, South Korean geologists placed the explosive yield at 550 tons of TNT equivalent (0.55 kilotons), (66) the French Atomic Energy Commission's estimate was 0.50 kilotons, (67) and Russian Minister of Defense Sergei Ivanov placed the yield at 5 to 15 kilotons.
The bomb which was dropped on Hiroshima at the end of the Second World War, by comparison, had a yield of just 20 kilotons, equivalent to 20,000 tons of explosive.
For example, the brightest flash recorded from orbit since 1965 probably resulted from a kinetic-energy yield of roughly 5 kilotons. One reason for the shortfall is that many airbursts go unreported, even though satellites detect them, because the systems and their handlers are watching for hostile activity and often either overlook or ignore natural events.
Already Pakistan has tried to detonate a 35 kiloton device while India itself claims to have tested a 60 kiloton bomb.
DSM Elastomers announced that its 80 kiloton EPDM capacity expansion in Geleen the Netherlands is on schedule, with completion foreseen by the end of the year.
Recent internationally supervised experiments have shown that a global network of monitoring centers can already pinpoint explosions down to one kiloton. The leaders of Sweden, Greece, India, Argentina, Tanzania and Mexico have offered to set up such centers, the better to verify compliance with any test ban.
A person standing at least 10 miles away from the point a 10 kiloton bomb is dropped, would have 10 to 15 seconds to take limited protective measures.
analysts said North Korea's first bomb test, in October 2006, produced an explosive yield at less than 1 kiloton (1,000 tons) of TNT.
Dow also completed a 40 kiloton per year expansion of its propylene oxide name-plate capacity in Stade in January 2007.